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DECEMBER. 1923 




-LIBRfp 



,J*4tM: 



TO OUR COACH 

ORIN E. HOLLINGBERY 

IN APPRECIATION OF HIS UNCEASING EFFORTS IN BEHALF 

OF HIS ALMA MATER, THE DECEMBER CLASS OF 

1923 DEDICATES THIS ISSUE OF 

THE L-W-L LIFE 



FOREWORD 

IT is the intention of the Faculty and the officers of 
the Student Body to design a pin which will be the 
school's standard insignia, as well as the individual 
class pin. 

A tentative suggestion is presented on page eight. It 
is a well-worked-up idea for the L. W. L. insignia, rep- 
resenting, first, the Tiger, our emblem; second, the idea 
of separate foundations combined into one institution; 
and third, the fact that the founders of the school were 
pioneers of the Gold Days of '49. 

To have a good standard school pin is of great value 
to the students, due to the fact that if it is well worked 
up, as the suggestion on page eight is, we shall never be 
afraid of having our school represented by a faulty 
class pin. 

The incoming officers and members of the Student 
Body should take immediate steps in following up this 
idea. Now that we have started, let's put this thing over 
next semester. 

Another task which we must leave to the future 
officers is that of changing the name of our school 
journal. 

A vote of the students taken this term was in favor 
of "The L. W. L. Tiger." 

It is a change that will eventually be made, so why 
not next term ? 






lH(joritents| 




S^^^F 



2OT 



EX LIBRIS 

DEDICATION 

FACULTY 

SENIORS 

LITERARY 

EDITORIALS 

ALUMNI NOTES 

SCHOOL EVENTS 

ATHLETICS 

JOKES 

AUTOGRAPHS 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 




George A. Merrill, B. S., Director, L. W. L. 



LUX 

Theresa M. Otto, B. L., Dean English 

Dorothy Gardner Housekeeping, Laundering 

Ida H. Nielsen, B. S Cooking, Dietetics 

Mary L. Crittenden Dressmaking 

Lorette A. Roumiguiere Sewing 

Betty Elkins .... Millinery 

Clara Fassett Domestic Art 

Bernice F. Peavey Drawing 

Rhoda R. Reed, B. S., M. A Science, Mathematics 

Margaret L. Pickles, A. B Household Science 

Eleanor Crofts, A. B Physical Training, Health, Hygiene 

Maude L. Collett, A. B English and History 

Marie O. Weller, A. B English and History 

Martha G. Wickersham Recorder 



[6] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 



LICK 

Bruno Heymann, M. E., Dean Mechanical Drawing 

Alice E. Donegan, A. B English and Latin 

Sydney A. Tibbetts, B. S Chemistry 

Martin J. Lefler, B. S Mathematics 

Max A. Plumb, B. S Physics and Mathematics 

Stella Boulware, A. B Freehand Drawing 

J. M. Sunkel Machine Shop 

J. L. Mathis Forgework 

Fred Miehle Mechanical Drawing 

Gladys E. Buck Recorder 



WILMERDING 

George F. Wood, Dean Plumbing and Sheetmetal 

L. S. Holmes Woodwork 

A. H. French, B. S Science 

Etta M. Reeves, A. B English and Latin 

Agnes Wood, A. B Algebra 

Mrs. Evelyn M. Woodland, B. L., M. L History and English 

C. E. Dow Auto Mechanics 

Fred H. Mighall Stonework 

George E. O'Connor Electrical Work 

Olive Barnum Recorder 



7\ 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



OUR ENDOWMENTS 

THE CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL ARTS 

For Boys and Girls 

Founded by James Lick 

© © © © 

WILMERDING SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

For Boys 
Founded by Jillis Clute Wilmerding 

see© 

LUX SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL TRAINING 

For Girls 
Founded by Miranda Wilmarth Lux 



Supplemented by the Frederick B. Ginn Bequest for 
Orphan Boys; the Horace Davis Loan Fund; the Rudolph J. 
Taussig Memorial Fund. 

Our boys are organized in the Lick-Wilmerding Student 
Body of about 400 members. Colors, Black and Gold; School 
Flower, Tiger Lily. 

Our girls are organized in the Lux Student Body; Colors, 
White and Gold; School Flower, Matilija Poppy. 

All are united in the L-W-L Student Body. 

Our Symbol is "The Tiger." 

Our Proposed Insignia: 




[8] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 



MINUTES OF THE '23X CLASS 

HAD you been standing in the hall on the first day of school in the winter 
of 1920, you might have seen the first groups of representatives of the 
prospective Class of '23X. At that time our unsophistication in the matter 
of high school manners and customs could plainly be seen. During the four years 
that have elapsed between the above date and the present, many events have 
taken place. It is the purpose, therefore, of this history to outline the evolution 
and rise of the class from mere Freshmen to mighty Seniors. 

The class originally contained about seventy boys and fourteen girls, but the 
number of fellows is now about thirty-five, while the girls number three. Such a 
small number in the class at Lux is responsible for the lack of organized activities 
on the part of the girls. 

Our first semester had an excellent beginning under the guidance of Ralph 
McClinton and Bill Hazlitt. The efforts of these Seniors in our behalf were many, 
and to them we extend our sincere gratitude. 

Our debut in the social life of Lick came in the form of a pleasant reception, 
given to us by the members of the '21X Class. 

The class, as stoneworkers, was responsible for the completion of the Lick 
Building, the main entrance being our donation. 

At the opening of the second semester we elected Bill Watson to the office of 
President, and through his efforts the class progressed. Our first year in high school 
came to a successful close at a bazaar given by the Student Body, in which we took 
an active part. At last the day had come when we were no longer lowly Freshmen. 

On returning to school we again chose Watson as our president. Our social 
events were not numerous, probably because most of the fellows were still girl- 
shy and preferred to devote their time to athletics. However, a luncheon was 
held at Lux by the class. After devouring everything in sight, there was dancing 
on the "Roof Garden," the music being supplied by the '23X orchestra. 

The affairs of the class for the second half of the Soph year were entrusted 
to Roy Barthold, who piloted us through the term in a creditable manner. The 
class "riots" were enjoyed immensely by all concerned. 

When we returned to our routine in January, 1922, we felt as though we were 
of some consequence in the affairs of the school. We had reached our Junior year. 
We started the term in a lively manner with Barthold again at our head. The 
members of the class hiked to Mount Tamalpais on a Saturday during the winter, 
when the peak was covered with snow. On arriving at the snow-line, a fierce and 
mighty battle ensued. Things were very damp for some time, but all the members 
of the party greatly enjoyed it. At a later date in the same term, a picnic was 

[IO] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

given by our class to the Freshmen who had entered the school only a short time 
previously. The outing was held at Pinehurst and proved to be very successful. 
We regret that this had to be the last affair of its kind, as the Junior-Freshman 
Picnic was always looked forward to by the whole student body. 

Art Weaver presided during the second semester of our Junior year, and this 
term was devoted mainly to participating in activities about school. Our debating 
team, composed of Weaver, Barthold, and Jenkel, captured the interclass. To win 
this honor, the team had to defeat all of the best talent of the school, and the 
competition was very keen. 

The last year passed all too swiftly, probably because the fellows had much 
to accomplish before bidding farewell to Lick. In our first semester as Seniors. 
Al Owen was at the head of the class, while in our final term we had another able 
president in Harold Crane. The outstanding events of the year were two launch 
rides which were successfully floated. The itineraries included stops at Tiburon, 
Paradise Cove, and the warships anchored in the Bay. Both trips were "stag" 
parties, and were greatly enjoyed by all except "Phat" Andrews, who became sea- 
sick and nearly fell overboard several times. 

The number of athletes in our class was many, and a number of the fellows 
have become well known through their prowess. In football we had Crane, Ander- 
son, Ames, Haase, Best, Gianetti, and Green; in basketball, Sommerfeld, Green, 
Panella, Crane, Anderson, Barthold, and Stromberg; in track, Anderson and Crane; 
in swimming, Crane and Panella; in baseball, Clyde and Crane; and in tennis, 
De Ryana. 

The climax to our school life was the "Senior Informal," a farewell dance to the 
three schools. This event, taking place in the ballroom of the Bellevue Hotel, 
was a crowning success, rivaling the Senior dances of several years ago. The music 
was supplied by Ed Stirm's Melodious Syncopaters. 

We now bid farewell to Lick, Wildmerding, and Lux! In the heart of each 
graduate there remains a purpose, as firm and strong as Gibraltar, to live up to 
the high standards impressed upon him during his four years in the institution. 

Now we separate; some to gain higher education, some to strive for and obtain 
a position of rank in the business world, while others go out to seek adventure- 
For all of us there will be battles to fight — and we will fight them with the old 
"Tiger Spirit" — and win! 

Whatever happens, we shall always strive to uphold the name of our Alma 
Mater and the banner of '23 with honor and glory; and our years at L-W-L will 
be the incentive and inspiration for future achievement. 



[Hi 




K. Purvis 
F. Buchhoi.z 



H. Crane 
E. Levy 

[12] 



M. Fagan 
J. Panella 




W. SOMMERFELD 

E. Andrews 
L. Peterson 



G. Munk 
A. Hendrickson 



D. Sweet 

C. Johnson 

D. Stearns 



[13] 




C. Clyde 


W. Ames 


M. GlANETTI 


G. Ewing 




J. Meyer 


J. KlLLEEN 


L. GlLFETHER 


R. Wuthrich 



[14] 




A. Owen 

R. Barthold 

F. Bjork 



A. Anderson 
M. Green 

[15] 



A. De Ryana 
W. Best 
T. Haase 




L. Nelson 
R. Hansen 

A. GUSTAFSON 



A. Weaver 
W. Haussler 

[16] 



G. Johnson 

E. Stirm 

G. Stromberg 




[17] 




> . Eide Ferrari o — 



fi8] 




E«cle Ferrari „ ^^. 



[19] 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



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[20] 



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THE L-W-L LIFE 





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[21] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 



FAREWELL 

Farewell, farewell! Alas, it means the end 
For something that has been and is no more; 
So, as all else, these days have come and gone, 
And like the petals of a blossoming rose. 
Our lives do fall apart, each petal blown 
In seeming aimless quest, finding a place 
In this great world. The petals now are gone. 
But yet the stem to which they clung remains, 
The everlasting love of our old school, 
That love which binds our lives forevermore. 



Horace Tilden. 



[22] 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



THE L-W-L LIFE 




THE LONELY STRANGER 

Fred Buchholz, '23X 

I DON'T know just what it was that attracted me to him. I had been observing 
him for half an hour and not once did he change his expression; that of a man 
who was grimly set on a certain purpose. 

I was, as usual, dining at the Grand Hotel. The room was quite crowded. His 
table was directly opposite mine, so I had an excellent chance to scrutinize him 
closely. 

I was in a gloomy mood that evening. I had grown tired, as most men will, of my 
daily routine of work. Nothing of interest had happened the last few months. My 
nature demanded a change from the dull commonplace things of life. I wanted 
action and I wanted it at once. 

As I sat there watching that strange man, it suddenly occurred to me that per- 
haps here was a case, if further investigated, might prove interesting. 

It may have been my sudden thirst for action that made me walk over to his 
table and sit beside him; more probably it was merely curiosity. I had often heard 
that curiosity was the curse of mankind; but I had discarded that idea as the saying 
of some crank who had not fared well in life. 

As I sat down beside him, trying to appear unconcerned, I noticed that he gave 
a little start. He probably had become so absorbed in his thoughts that he was 
unconscious of his surroundings. I knew that I would have to force the procedures, 
so I made a brave attempt to draw him into conversation. As near as I can remember, 
our acquaintance started in this manner. 

"Good evening!" 

"Evening." 

"Dining along this evening?" 
Yes. 



[>3l 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

"Stranger in town?" 

JNo. 
"Dine down here often?" 

rso. 

"I thought I hadn't seen you here before. Nice place; been coming here for al- 
most a year now. Good eats. Wonderful music. Interested in music?" 

No answer. I realized that I was not progressing as I should. I took encourage- 
ment in the fact that the man did not seem suspicious of me. He had answered me 
civilly enough, although his replies were brief. We were both silent for several 
minutes. I tried to appear interested in the pattern of the silverware the waiter had 
so thoughtfully set in front of me. I again attempted conversation. 

"Pretty fair weather we've been having." 
Lan t say it is. 

"Oh, well, it's good enough if one spends most of his time indoors. Never did 
object to the weather in Chicago. Great city! Like it?" 

"Hate it." 

"Do you ? I manage to have a pretty fair time. They have some good shows here. 
Like the shows?" 

"No, they're terrible." 

It struck me that my companion was not such an agreeable sort of a fellow, but 
I decided to overlook this and try to obtain his good will. 

I talked of various incidents that had happened around the city, but my friend 
gave only curt replies to all my questions. Not once did he ask a question. We pro- 
ceeded in this manner for about twenty minutes, when suddenly he turned his chair 
toward me and said: 

"Well, I guess you think you've got me. Think you're pretty clever, don't you?" 

"What do you mean?" I asked in amazement. 

"Mean? You know what I mean. You followed me here and then tried to pull 
the old story of a genial native being sociable to a lonely stranger." 

"You must be mistaken. Why should I want to follow you? Who the devil are 

you, anyway?" 

"Don't tell me that you don't know that I'm wanted for the robbery of the 
Gilden Hotel last week. You'll never get anybody by using your crude methods. I 
suppose you think you've got me. Well, you haven't. I've friends here. All I have 
to do is give a signal and the lights will go out, and I can beat it out of the door over 
there." 

"Wait a minute. You've got me wrong. I didn't follow you here. I don't want 
you. I'm a contractor, not a detective. You better go before some cop gets you. 
After this, don't suspect every fellow that tries to be friendly towards you." 

[24] 



DECEMBER, 1923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

He looked at me for a minute and then sneered, "Expect me to believe that? 
Not by a long shot. I can't afford to be caught. Hope you have better luck next 
time. 

With that he uttered a shrill whistle; the lights went out; quick as a flash he 
leaned over and knocked me unconscious. 

I was all right the next day, save for a lump on my head. The police asked me a 
lot of questions, but I told them I didn't remember what happened. 

I still go down to the Grand Hotel and have dinner. I always dine alone. I lost 
my thirst for action and settled down to my dull routine, which I found wasn't so 
dull after all. 



HE CLIPPED BECAUSE HE HAD TO 

Frank Haley, '25J 

This was Tony Moreno's third year at Stephens High, and the next season 
would be his last chance to make the squad. He had gone out for two previous 
years but had never managed to stay on, either through lack of speed or a 
deficiency in scholarship. 

Tony was a backfield man, so tackling and clipping was a regular part of the 
spring practice routine. Tackling was no obstacle to him, but he could never bring 
himself to like clipping practice. This was probably because he could not seem to 
acquire the knack of "leaving his feet" as the other boys did. Consequently, when 
the first practice game was called, Coach Hobbs said, looking directly at Moreno, 
"If you fellows don't leave your feet and clip in this game with Handford I'll be 
forced to drop you from the squad. It's the last chance you will get to show me your 
"stuff"" before the cut." 

One week, — and the Handford game was on. This found Tony playing left half 
in the last period. The score stood: Handford, 12; Stephens, 7. The ball was on the 
Handford fifteen-yard line, with first down for Stephens. A completed forward pass 
quickly followed by an end run and a fast buck brought the ball to the four-yard 
line with first down. 

Four yards to go and Stephens would win by a touchdown! 

Buck! Run! Shift! Pass! There seemed to be a stone wall confronting Stephens- 
Then the quarterback saw a hole for the weak side buck, and the ball was snapped! 

Bang! the Handford fullback smashed into Stephens' man and the ball stopped 
just there. Tony Moreno, who was running interference, had missed the clip by 

[25] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

only falling to his knees. His man, the fullback, got the tackle. This upset Stephens' 
chance to score and they lost the game. 

The next day Coach Hobbs announced the cut of squad and among those 
dropped was the name of A. Moreno. 

Ruefully Tony walked away from the manager, who had informed him. 

"Well," thought Tony, "that won't keep me from the squad next fall, anyway. 
I'll practice clipping until I'll be the best in school." He was a youth who usually 
meant what he said, so that night he began. 

He fashioned a dummy for practice, in the backyard at home, and all the rest of 
the term could be found there in his spare time. By the time summer vacation had 
come he could knock the dummy fifteen feet from its supports. He knew none of 
the other boys could do this. His goal realized, he could afford to practice easily. 

School closed and Tony got a job in a machine shop operating a pneumatic 
chipping gun for the summer. It was during the rush of the World War and all 
hands were needed in the shop, doing government work. Executives, men who could 
handle other men, were especially valuable at that time. 

One day the shop manager was standing near Tony's bench talking to the fore- 
man. He was deeply interested and both were bent intently over a blueprint. With 
straining, creaking sounds, heavily laden traveling cranes were passing to and fro 
overhead. 

"If one of those gave way what would happen ?" mused Tony as he worked. "It 
would make scrap of anything on this floor if it did, I guess." 

Almost as if Tony's thoughts had been a warning, one of the supports that held 
the rails for the cranes began to quiver and sway in the middle. The nearest crane 
was but ten feet from this weak support, and as it came on the strain naturally be- 
came great and the support could not withstand the pressure. Tony saw the im- 
pending danger and cried out to the foreman. He and the manager were still busy 
on the blueprint and paid no heed to Tony's cries of warning. Realizing the need of 
competent action quickly, the only thing Tony could think of was "Clip! Leave 
your feet! Hit low and hard!" Driven by this impulse, he charged straight at the 
two bosses, left his feet, and the shock of the impact of his body threw the two men 
at least twelve feet away. No sooner had this occurred when, with a rip and rending 
of steel, the giant crane came hurtling to the floor. A large iron bar, dislodged by 
the blow, landed on Tony's leg with such force as to throw him again to the floor, 
but this time he was not bothered as to whether or not he would hit low enough. 

The next thing Tony was able to remember, he was in a hospital and had a 
sharp pain in his right leg. He heard the doctor saying, "Yes, the bone has been 
fractured and will require at least four months to knit." 

[26] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

Tony could have cried out at this, for it meant his chance to make Stephens' 
football squad was gone. 

"Oh, well," sorrowfully said Tony to one of "the gang," later, "they say I 
helped 'do my bit' by clipping the manager, but I did want to make that football 
team." 



A DAY WITH THE SENIORS 

R. M. Scott, '24J 

The first in the morning is Physics Four; 
We're ready and waiting at Mr. Plumb's door. 

At nine-forty-five the bell rings again; 

In English we learn about kings and bad men. 

The next class is Latin, where we do sweat; 
It surely is hard, on that you can bet. 

The last before noon is Solid Geometry, 

Where we learn Mathematics and Plane Trigonometry. 

At twelve o'clock the rush begins; 

In the Caf we jabber and fill our bins. 

Omnibus is a period for study; 

It's a wonderful place for everybody. 

Civics is new for the '24J; 

We learn about the Nation's play. 

The last three periods are spent in the shops; 
At four o'clock all the machinery stops. 

[27] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

THE PINK POODLE 

Dorothy Essner, '24X 

A WHIRL of exotic color — a tantalizing buzz of conversation — the wailing, 
moaning, clashing strains of a jazz orchestra — the brilliant flash of jewels 
and electric lights. A weird scream! — a crash! — darkness! — silence! 

I stood speechless, paralyzed. A cold chill crept up my back to the roots of my 
hair. 

As suddenly as they had gone off, the lights flashed on again, revealing a 
frightened mob, pushing, shoving, and scrambling, trying to find a way out. 

From my vantage point on the stairs, I surveyed the crowd, trying vainly to 
discover my hostess. At last in desperation I turned to obtain my wraps and depart 
with the rest of the excited guests. 

At the foot of the steps a hand clutched my arm and a trembling voice exclaimed 
hysterically, "It's Woudie! It's Woudie! Oh! I wish I were dead!" 

I turned in amazement to see Mrs. Barton-Tyler standing beside me, her eyes 
wide with fright and her face deathly pale under the rouge. 

In spite of a sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach, and a dryness of throat that 
made speech difficult, I tried to make my voice sound reassuring. 

"My dear Mrs. Barton-Tyler," I said protectively, "what terrible thing has 
happened? Is it possible that I may be of service to you?" 

"Woudie," she moaned, half fainting into my arms, giving no thought at all, 
it appeared, to her fleeing guests. "He's killing him!" 

"Shall I call the police?" I inquired, almost hysterical myself. 

At this she electrified into consciousness. "No!" she gasped. "No!" almost in a 
scream. 

Suddenly a soft whine was heard on the stairs. My hostess left me uncere- 
moniously and rushed up. I stood for a few minutes alone in the hall and then, as no 
one appeared, took my hat and gloves and left. Out in the cool night air I felt my 
self-control gradually returning. 



The next day a small person wrapped in furs and plumes and gleaming with 
silks and jewels entered my office. At first I could not place her, but she introduced 
herself and I recognized my hostess of the night before — Mrs Barton-Tyler. 

[28] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

"Mr. Sydney," she began effusively, "you are a lawyer; you must help me," 
and burst into tears. 

I have had many types of women come to me for counsel, but never one quite 
like Mrs. Barton-Tyler. There was somewhat of a mystery about her. She and her 
husband had come just recently to live in the Van Crofts mansion on Park Hill 
Drive. The drive had once been the center of an exclusive residence district, but 
now, as the city grew westward, it was slowly falling into decay and ruin, retaining 
only the merest vestige of the magnificence it had once boasted. Very few of the 
old homes were left. The Van Crofts place was one of the few. Up to several months 
ago it had been occupied by Judge Van Crofts, a taciturn, gloomy old man, who 
always looked at life with a cynical bitterness, and his son, Wallace, a sporty, dissi- 
pated boy of about twenty-two. 

Suddenly the two had left home and then had come news of Judge Van Crofts' 
death, and the son had never been heard of since. 

Then the Barton-Tylers appeared from nowhere to live there. Ever since their 
arrival, Mrs. Barton-Tyler had been trying to "get into society," but they would not 
have her, so she had resorted to entertaining the next best thing, the "would-be's." 
She was continually giving large, brilliant affairs. 

It was such an affair that had terminated so disastrously the night before. I do 
not know how I happened to receive an invitation, but I did, so went out of curi- 
osity. 

I was now indeed glad I had attended. Perhaps here was a chance to lay bare 
facts concerning the death of Judge Van Crofts and the strange disappearance of his 
son. 

Mrs. Barton-Tyler stopped crying as suddenly as she had begun. 

"The will," she began incoherently. "He left such an odd will." 

"Yes," I encouraged. Then suddenly I gasped, "The will; did Van Crofts leave a 
will? No one knew that!" 

"Why yes, "she answered in surprise. "He left all of his estate to us; I am his 
niece. But it has one very odd clause. We must not sell the house, nor remodel it in 
any way, nor dismiss one of the servants, an odd person who seems to have no 
particular place in the establishment." She paused for breath. 

I waited eagerly for her to continue — an interesting case indeed! 

"He is a peculiar person, tall, dark, and old; and he hates Woudie. I know he has 
tried to kill him. Oh, 0-0-0-0-h!" She showed signs of bursting into tears again. 

"Pardon me, Madame," I interrupted, "may I inquire who Woudie is?" 

"Why, he is my pink poodle. He's worth fifty thousand dollars. The servant 

[29] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

nearly killed him last night," she answered, as though surprised that I should be so 
ignorant. 

"He was bearable till Jim brought him home to me. Now he is insufferable. I 
believe he tries to kill him every chance he gets." 

From this somewhat ambiguous statement I gathered that the dog was, for 
some unknown reason, particularly obnoxious to the servant. 

"Did the Judge leave nothing to his son?" I inquired. 

Mrs. Barton-Tyler looked at me with a sharpness that may have portended 
some sinister knowledge, or merely showed fear of losing part of the fortune. 

"Oh, no," she answered hurriedly. "He left him before he died. He left every- 
thing to us. It is wonderful to be so wealthy. We had nothing before now, you know." 

Watching her closely, I answered guardedly, "Indeed. It must be so." 

"But what I came to you for, Mr. Sydney, was to see if you could change the 
will so we could dismiss this servant. Wills have been changed before, haven't they?" 

"Yes, they have, under certain conditions," I replied. "I should have to look 
into the case before I take it up." 

"Oh, thank you, Mr. Sydney," she answered. "Can you call tomorrow after- 
noon?" Already she was at the door. I had barely time to answer affirmatively 
before it closed on her. 



A few hours later the phone rang and I answered it. A hysterical voice sounded 
over the wire. 

"He is dead! He has killed him!" 

I recognized the voice of Mrs. Barton-Tyler. I waited but heard no further 
sound. I rattled the hook frantically. 

"Number-r-r-ple-ease?" came laconically to my ear. I banged down the receiver 
in desperation. 

Seeing nothing to do but go to her, I called an old college friend, now a secret 
service man, who had just come to town on a case, and together with the chief of 
police and two officers we left for the Van Crofts' home 

On our arrival Mrs. Barton-Tyler greeted us hysterically. 

"I knew he would. Why did we ever accept the terms of the will?" she wailed. 

"Who is killed? Who did it? How did it happen?" demanded the chief gruffly. 

"Woudie. That horrid person did it," as a glimpse of the servant was caught as 
he tried to pass unobtrusively by a doorway. 

The secret service man suddenly sprang forward and caught him by the collar. 

[30 I 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

"John Calvin!" he gasped. 

A brief struggle ensued. The younger man easily triumphed. I moved to his side. 

"Judge Van Crofts!" I exclaimed. 

We stared at each other in amazement over the prostrate form. 

"So that's your game?" my friend said in a barely audible voice. 

"What did you call him?" I asked. "He is Judge Van Crofts, who is supposed to 
have died." 

"He is a notorious bootlegger," he answered. "He is also suspected of selling 
narcotics. His was certainly a clever way of getting out of the public eye and from 
within the net of the law. We had him nearly caught when suddenly he disappeared. 
We heard he had died. His son has escaped to we don't know where. He was his 
accomplice." 

"But why did he kill my Woudie? "sobbed Mrs. Barton-Tyler. 

"He was most likely always walking in on his secrets," I explained. 

"Most likely," amended the secret service man ; then, " Madame, do you 
realize that your dog has been instrumental in breaking up one of the best, most 
expertly run narcotic and liquor circles in the country?" 



Up! Up! my Friend, and quit your books; 

Or surely you'll grow double: 
Up! Up! my Friend, and clear your looks; 

Why all this toil and trouble? 

Books! 'tis a dull and endless strife: 
Come, hear the woodland linnet, 

How sweet his music! on my life, 
There's more of wisdom in it. 



-Wordsworth. 



[31] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

JIM AND JOE 

Horace Tilden, '24J 

Two young brothers, Jim and Joe, 

Came from the East in '51; 
They came from the land of ice and snow, 

Out to the land of the golden sun. 

They staked a claim on the mountain range, 

And settled down to earnest work; 
They labored along without tho't of change, 

For neither was ever known to shirk. 

A few short years went quickly by; 

They prospered and all was moving well, 
When Joe decided that he would try 

On the old lead horse a new style-bell. 

Jim said, "No, the old bell's good; 

We want no change in this here place." 
And Joe got mad and vowed he would, 

For a "two-cent piece," slap his brother's face. 

Jim wouldn't speak to Joe that night, 

And all through the evening meal they sat, 
In the smoke of the dim old lantern-light, 

With never a move to end the spat. 

Jim smoked in silence his faithful cob, 

While Joe pretended to read a book; 
Each felt in his heart a heavy throb, 

But neither would yield by word or look. 

For weeks and months they kept this up, 

Each of them proud as a mighty king; 
Although they drank from the same gourd cup, 

They would not speak for anything. 

The ranch was sold and the brothers quit, 

Each going his way with an angry heart. 
Neither could tell the cause of it, 

Nor why it was best that they should part. 

Long years went by, and the brothers still 

As strangers passed when they chanced to meet; 

And both in worldly goods fared ill, 
With more of bitter than of sweet. 

[32] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

But Joe fell ill one wintry day, 

He was old and feeble and almost gone; 
He knew 'twas near the end of his way, 

With no one of kin to lean upon. 

His proud heart yearned for a kindly word. 

But never a sound escaped his lip; 
The brotherly love in his old heart stirred, 

But he locked it up with an iron grip. 

His brother Jim lived across the hill, 

A few short miles from his brother Joe; 
And he knew that Joe was deadly ill, 

But he made no sign that he wished to go. 

One dark day dawned when Joe was dead, 

His cold mute lips were stern in death; 
A stranger hand had smoothed his head 

As life passed out with his waning breath. 

And Joe lies now in his silent grave, 

With never a care to trouble him; 
He let life go for what life gave; 

But how fares it now with his brother Jim? 

Jim lies, sick, on his lonely cot, 

Broken in strength but his heart still proud; 
And he thinks all day of his lonely lot, 

And he longs all night for his waiting shroud. 

His thot's go back to the morn of life, 

When he and Joe were boys; 
Before they had tasted of bitter strife, 

Or young hearts were robbed of childish joys. 

And he thinks of the time when they knelt in prayer 
At their mother's knee, when both were young; 

And again in fancy he lingers there, 

And hears once more the songs she sung. 

It sounds as the voice of an angel now, 

And he wonders why he was doomed to grow, 
And why the mother-love could allow 

The bitter break with his brother Joe. 

Perhaps, some day, in the heavenly place, 

Where both by the laws of man should go, 
The brothers may meet, and there embrace, 

And end the trouble of Jim and Joe. 

[33] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 



BEDTIME STORIES 

{From Station I. 0. U.) 
Roy Mooney, '24J 

SNICK (himself), super-athlete and student extraordinary, was a product of 
Goof Center, which fact the citizens of that district tried hard to keep under 
cover. 



R 



Now "Arsie" (he with the laughing hair and curling eyes) was forever sending 
posies to the fair but fickle Lotta Gall, and in order to make a suitable husband for 
the cross-eyed beauty, he went to Davis Farm, took the stock course and came out a 
broker. 

It was while attending this institution that our hero came into his own. He was 
a born athlete. In his first year in college he was halfback on the Varsity and all the 
way back in his studies. 

Hiss-s-s-s! Enter the villain. Mr. I. B. Tuff. He really was a "tough egg." At 
the age of three he had hair on his teeth and he cut his milk teeth on the curbstone. 
Now, at the tender age of forty-three, he was playing on the Varsity squad of 
Podunk University, bitterest enemy of Davis. 

To make a short, sad story shorter and sadder, let it be known that Tuff also 
kept company with Lotta and so became the hated enemy of R. Snick. 

Poor Lotta was in an awful fix. She loved them both, but didn't know which one 
to choose, and so she decided that whoever was on the winning side in the big game 
that one would she wed. 

At last! The big game and the two little playmates met on the field of combat. 
"Arsie" was the big star. He made more yards than a clothing salesman and covered 
more ground than two steam rollers. There came a time when the score was tied at 
50-50. "Arsie" took the egg on the ten-yard line and broke through for a short 
ninety-yard run. It so happened that Tuff was the only man between him and the 
goal line. When our hero saw this, his face shook and his knees turned pale, but 
with great presence of mind he reached in his vest pocket, yanked out a flatiron and 
hit Tuff so hard that when he came down everybody had gone home and "Arsie" 
was in the clubhouse darning his socks. Tuff promptly offered a big reward for his 
teeth and got most of them back. 



Of course they lived happily ever after. 
MORAL: Try and find one. 

[34] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

THE TIGER TEAM 

E. Stoutenburgh, '24J 

Here's to our Tiger Team, 

For the good old Black and Gold. 
They play like charging tigers, 

And they're always hard to hold. 

Childe Harold plays at quarter, 

There's big Red to help him out; 
When the two get into action 

You should hear the grandstands shout. 

Horace Tilden and Bill Lawrence 

Run interference for the backs, 
And when they start in clipping 

They hit and something cracks. 

Skinney Anderson and Jimmy Eagan 

Are both playing end. 
When either catches a forward pass 

Everybody is his friend. 

Big Nelson plays one tackle, 

Little Roland is the other; 
As the scrimmage play starts in 

They make holes for one another. 

Cal Lausten and Mope Ames 

At guard play the game. 
There aren't any others 

That are quite the same. 

Fat Haase plays at center; 

He passes straight and true. 
The other center, at the end, 

Is always black and blue. 

Thus, Hail to our Tiger Team! 

And may they always come 
Victorious through all their games, 

And win them every one. 



[35] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I 92 3 



THE FINAL PAYMENT 

Fred Buchholz, '23X 

Ridley, Massachusetts, 
May 4, 1914. 
Dear Pal Jack: 

No doubt you will be surprised to hear from me after my disappearance two 
months ago. Truth is, I'm under a great mental strain and I had to get away from 
the city. 

You are the only person in whom I am going to confide at this time of anxiety. 
You, and all my friends, probably think of me as an honest, well-satisfied bachelor 
of forty. How hard it has been in the last four years to go about and have people 
keep that impression of me. No one, not even you, dreamed that underneath the 
amiable Roger Clayton was a man who could not call his soul his own; a man whose 
conscience tortured him day and night. 

At midnight the end will come. I have prepared systematically for my death. 
At midnight, as I am sitting in my chair, I will be murdered. You probably think 
I am mad. God knows I wish I were mad. The worst punishment a man can have is 
to know the hour of his death. 

At midnight, May 4, 1910, one of my companions was found murdered in his 
home. What a shock to all of us! Exactly a year later another one of my companions 
was murdered. The other two were murdered exactly a year apart. I will be the last 
to pay for the crime. 

It is now eleven o'clock. Only an hour to live. I can hardly realize that I shall 
not see the faces I love any more. A state of calmness has overtaken me. I am glad 
the end is near. For four years I have been cursed with a tortured memory. Some- 
thing like a sinister hand out of the darkness has slowly crushed me. 

Five years ago tonight my four companions and I committed an act which they 
have paid for. Tonight I must pay. The five of us took Andrew Bower out to a 
lonely spot in the country and murdered him. 

We hated the man although he was innocent of any serious crime. We had 
planned our steps cunningly. We thought we were safe. It developed that an un- 
known friend of Bowers outwitted us and saw the crime. We were ignorant of this 
till a year later. 

The murderer probably is watching me this very moment. This letter will reach 
you through trusted hands. Well, good-bye, old pal, please don't judge me too 
harshly, as I have paid a hundred-fold for my crime. God bless you and your 
brother, Dave. 

Your dear friend, 

Roger Clayton. 



[36] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

Dear Dave: 

Several gruesome events have happened since you left. Our old pal, Roger Clay- 
ton, was found murdered in his library last night. At exactly midnight the servants 
heard a scream. They rushed to the library and found him lying on the floor with a 
knife through his heart. Beside him lay the dead form of another man. It must have 
been a horrible sight to see those two dead forms lying there. 

In the coat of this other man was a letter containing news that startled Boston. 
It did not surprise me, as I will explain later. 

The letter said that he was Paul Bower. He told how Roger and four others 
murdered his cousin, Andrew Bower. I suppose you remember that mysterious 
murder of five years ago. Well, Bower wrote that he saw his cousin being murdered 
and swore that his innocent blood would not go unrevenged. He wrote on, how he 
carefully planned the murder of each of Roger's companions till only Roger him- 
self was left. 

I will quote his last words in the letter: "I, the cousin of Andrew Bower, am 
going to murder Roger Clayton tonight. After he is murdered I will run a knife 
through my heart. I have nothing to live for. My only friend was murdered five 
years ago. Four of the five murderers have paid. Tonight I collect the final pay- 
ment." 

That was all there was in the letter. Now, I will tell you why I was not surprised 
to hear this strange story. This morning I received a letter from Roger Clayton. It 
was his last message to the world. He told me the same tale as the letter on Bower's 
dead body contained. He knew his death was coming that night. He was prepared 
for the end. 

The whole afFair starting from five years ago has been a horrible thing. I will 
give you further details when you come back home. 

Your brother, 

Jack. 



THE SAVIOR 

Roy Mooney, '24J 

¥ H Tftii" GREGSON — the fastest and shiftiest halfback that ever played for 
old Baylor; that's what the students dubbed him. To show that their feel- 
ings ran in the same channel, the Black and Gold football squad had just 
elected him captain for the coming season. They then proceeded to show the world 
at large that they thoroughly appreciated his leadership by wildly applauding and 
lustily attempting to strain their vocal chords. The last-mentioned was nearly 

[37] 



W 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

accomplished when, after the season had been brought to a close, thirty strong 
voices shrieked in mad discord for "Speech! Speech! Speech!" 

Their captain, his eyes rapidly blurring, rose from his seat of honor at the head 
of the banquet table and then it was revealed that he stood erect only with the aid 
of a cane. A hush spread rapidly over the assemblage as he faced them, visibly 
affected by the splendid ovation tendered him by his comrades. Absolute silence 
finally prevailed and he stood fully a minute, blinking his eyes, evidently at a loss 
for what to say. The silence became almost provoking before he finally mustered up 
courage and began talking in a low suppressed tone: 

"Fellows, we played for old Baylor today and I am glad we played a winning 
game. I say we because, although I could not get out on the field, I was fighting with 
you, heart and soul, just the same. I realize, fellows, just how much faith was 
placed in my drop-kicking ability last season. In fact we really had a one-man team 
and in the big game with State we won by the margin of one lone drop kick, 3-0. 
I know that every one of you, at the beginning of this season, expected to win by 
the same method, and when I came out of the Templeton game with a broken leg 
you thought that all hope for a successful season was gone. It was, until the State 
game, when we won by three touchdowns. Winning this game, however, more than 
made up for our poor season, as State was easily the best in the West. How did we 
do it? There are many of you who will say that I was responsible, but you are mis- 
taken. Fellows, just one short month ago, I was for dropping the game entirely and 
there was only one thing that kept me from doing so, the entreaty of the biggest and 
noblest person in the school. He is sadly unfit physically for football, but he has 
more spirit for the game and for his school than every one of us combined. It was 
the spirit he instilled in me and which I attempted to instill into you that won our 
biggest game. He showed me, by the cheerful acceptance of his own unfortunate 
condition and his unfailing perseverance and devotion, that I had little to complain 
of. He pleaded, argued, and fought with me incessantly whenever the opportunity 
offered, and he finally showed me the path to victory. His remedy for our deplorable 
condition can be expressed in one word, namely, 'Fight.' It has been something 
unknown on our teams for a long time and when it returned victory came with it, 
hand in hand. From the time of the first whistle today until the timer's gun ended 
the game, there were eleven well-drilled maniacs fighting for Baylor and they fought 
their way to touchdown after touchdown as one unit! There were flaws, there were 
weak points, but there was no lack of fight in our aggressive machine! When 
'Spud' Dougherty smashed over for the first score, the world witnessed the return 
of America's best game to America's best school, and we owe this to one fellow. 
Men, I did not have him here tonight because I wished to surprise you, but now I 
suggest that we go in a body and bring him here as the honored guest. Probably 
none of you know him; the only reason I do is that we were thrown together in a 
room in Stanley Hall, because of crowded dormitory conditions. I did not realize 
the value of his companionship until I was down and out. Then, when everything 
seemed darkest, he showed me that there was hope, that we could win, if only we 

[38] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

would fight! Just what that fight did for us is now a matter of history and we owe 
it all to one, who, instead of playing the game, lives it. So, fellows, we'll now go to 
my room and get Harold Bolton, the savior of the team, and I'm proud to say, my 
best friend!" 

Five minutes later a wheel chair carrying a pale but thoroughly happy boy was 
pushed into place at the head of the table. He was greatly embarrassed when the 
crowd demanded a speech, but finally he gathered sufficient courage and began in a 
high-pitched, taut voice, "Fellows, I hardly know why I am so honored. I have done 
nothing that any other Baylor man would not have done if he had my opportunity, 
but I thank you, one and all, for bringing me here." 

This brief speech brought the team to its feet with an outburst of cheering that 
threatened seriously to tear the roof off", and it continued for many minutes. 

Exactly one hour and fifteen minutes later the banquet ended and the final 
scene disclosed Captain Gregson standing on the table leading a yell which ran like 
this: 

"Bolton! rah! rah! rah! rah! rah! rah! Bolton!" 



FIGHTING SPIRIT 

COLVIN TOLAND, '25J 

The ball shoots through the air 
Like a bullet from a gun. 
'Tis the much-waited-for kick-off; 
The game has just begun. 

A catch, and then a fumble; 
The ball is in the air, 
Suddenly a mad scramble, 
The game is on for fair. 

A hot and gruesome battle — 
Both teams are fighting hard, 
And little do the players know 
Their faces with blood are marred. 

[39] 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



Many are the heroes 
That are taken from the fray; 
Might be a broken bone or so 
Or maybe exhausted lay. 

For the school they dearly loved 
They have given all they had. 
And with this spirit in mind, 
They now are all too glad. 

With this selfsame spirit, 
The men who are left to play 
Go out upon the gridiron, 
In the last part of the fray- 
But look! The game is scoreless; 
Not a point has either team; 
With but a few minutes to go, 
Useless, the game, it seems. 

Suddenly the ball is caught 
By the End who is on the run. 
Just across the line he stumbles- 
Hurrah! The game we've won! 




[40] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 



EDITORIAL 

AT last the December, 1923, issue of the L-W-L Life has come from the press 
and again the age-old but all too true story of "the trials through which we 
have come" is in vogue. To the casual observer it might seem that this well- 
known clause is only a "hard-luck story," but now that we have taken our turn at 
publishing the journal, we realize that this phrase is an expression of the true 
feelings of the editor and manager. 

It has been a difficult and tedious task, but we feel that the knowledge and 
experience which we have gained will more than repay us for our efforts. 

Two striking essentials to school life have made themselves conspicuous by their 
absence. As we do not wish to preach we will only mention what these are, and leave 
them to be rectified, after being carefully deliberated upon, by those who wish to 
see this institution make the progress it deserves. The missing links to the chain of 
success are cooperation, and a greater degree of Student Management of Student 
Affairs and Activities. We are confident that there are methods for overcoming 
these, and we look to the parties interested in the welfare of the school, in their 
activities of the coming term, to do what they can in the matter of changing these 
conditions. 

We thank the members of the Faculty and the Staff, the LaFayette Studio, the 
Sierra Art and Engraving Company, and Mr. Elmo L. Buttle of H. S. Crocker 
Company for their untiring efforts to make a success of this publication. 



When the schools combined in 1915, there was some friction between them, and 
in an effort to bring about a settlement of one of the differences, a compromise was 
entered into. The joint Student Body accepted the old Lick colors, Black and Gold, 
and the name of the old Wilmerding publication, The Life, was chosen for the 
name of the L-W journal. 

Throughout the past few years there has been a growing tendency on the part 
of the students to change the name of this journal to the name which is more 
symbolic of the institution, "The Tiger." All the athletic teams representing the 
school are known by that name; the famous "Tiger Spirit" is the foundation upon 
which the life of the school rests; and the Tiger is the emblem of our institution. 
The publication representative of Lick-Wilmerding and Lux should, therefore, be 
called "The Tiger." 

Now that the issue has come before the Student Body and has been dealt with 
systematically, we hope that our successors will carry on the fight to a successful 
conclusion, and that the next issue will bear on its cover the name of "The L-W-L 
lger. 

[41] 




[42] 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



THE L-W-L LIFE 

Is published semi-annually by the students of the Lick-Wilmerding and Lux Schools. 
Subscriptions: 31-50 per annum. Single copies, 75 cents. 



Entered as second-class matter 
cisco under the 


November 6th, 1915, at the Postoffice in 
Act of Congress of March 3rd, 1879. 


San F 


ran- 


Volume IX 








No. 


2 


Exchange Address, 


The L-W-L Life, Sixteenth 
San Francisco, California 


and Utah Streets 







EDITOR Wm. E. A. Best 

MANAGER Roy R. Barthold 



Betty Duckel 

Alice Marshall 



Fred Bjork 
Ed deFerrari 



School Notes 
Albert Owen 
John Adams 
Kathryn Purvis 



ASSOCIATE STAFF 



ART STAFF 



LITERARY STAFF 

Organizations 
George Munk 
George Johnson 
Freda Maybach 



Athletics 

Albert Anderson 

John Panella 

Harold Crane 

Richard Keeble 

Marjorie Connor 

Jokes 
Mervyn Green 
Fred Buchholz 
Mildred Fagan 



Caltoft Lausten 
James Kaye 

Curtis Maybach 
Elizabeth Andresen 



Shop Notes 
Jack Wooll 
Russell Mayock 
Esther Levy 



[43] 




[44] 




[45] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

L-W-L ALUMNI NOTES 

W. J. Trauner, President 

IT is perhaps a little early to say very much about the activities of the Alumni 
Association for the present term. The Alumni are always a little slower than the 
schools in getting started on their social activities, nor do they have the oppor- 
tunity to have them with such frequency as the Student Bodies. 

However, the Alumni started with an Opening-of-the-Season Dance at the 
Century Club Hall, on Friday evening, September 28. It was just what we had 
planned it to be; a nice sociable affair, to get the season started, where we could 
meet some of our old friends again. 

We followed this up, just recently, by our Pre-Lowell Game Nite Rally, on the 
evening of October 19; and it certainly turned out to be fully up to our expectations. 
A fine big crowd showed up, both of the schools and of the Alumni, and if the 
results of the next day's game had any bearing on it, the Rally was a success. 
Speakers for the evening ranged all the way from Adolph Juddell of the '97 class, 
Perl Young of the '98 class, "Chick" O'Connor of the '05 class, and others of the 
"Old Gang," down to Babe Crane, the plucky little captain of last year's champion- 
ship team and this year's championship team to be. 

And now we are planning our Christmas Dance, to be held at the Hotel Whit- 
comb Roof on Friday evening, December 7. This is a regular annual affair, our 
Christmas Dance, and we are certainly expecting the usual big crowd. We have an 
excellent place for it, this year, and are planning on good dance music, so there will 
be those, as usual, who, after it is all over, will say, "Gee, I'm sorry I missed it!" 

Right after the Holiday Season, we will try to get those who are interested 
together for another play. Those given last year seemed to be appreciated greatly, 
which has encouraged us to try again this year. A notice of some kind will probably 
be mailed, and we are sincerely hoping for some good results. 

The Alumni wish to thank the Student Bodies for their help in the work of the 
Night Rally, and we like to think that our endeavors had something to do, in a 
small measure, at least, with your victory the next day. We wish you success till 
the end, and in whatever you may attempt, to be victorious, and believe us to be 
always behind you and ready to help, so long as victory can be attained in a good, 
clean, sportsmanlike manner. 



[46] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

L-W-L SOCIAL EVENTS 

STUDENT BODY DANCE 

On Friday, September 7, in the Freehand Drawing Room, we held our first 
dance of the term. School was closed at 2:40, and when the music for the first dance 
began, a crowd of enthusiastic students was ready for a pleasant afternoon. The 
music was furnished by one of the school orchestras, and the dance was very 
successful. 



SOPHOMORE-SENIOR DANCE 

On Friday, September 28, the '25X class entertained the High Seniors at an 
elaborate dance and reception. The Freehand Drawing Room had been cleverly 
decorated by the committee in charge, and the music was furnished by their own 
class orchestra. Refreshments were served between dances and the afternoon ended 
only too quickly. 



THE NIGHT RALLY 

One of the biggest events of the past term and one that will always remain in 
the minds of the students and Alumni, was our third annual "Night Rally." It has, 
been the custom for the past three years for the Alumni and the Student Body to 
come together and hold a big rally on the eve of the Lick-Wilmerding-Lowell 
football game. This year we held our rally in the Lux "Stadium," with Harry 
Trauner, President of the Alumni. We opened the rally with a big "Alibebo" that 
made the hills of San Francisco ring with its echo. There were various stunts put on 
by the classes and the orchestra; and the Glee Club added its share to the evening's 
entertainment. There were a number of "old-timers" who had played on our teams 
of former years in the audience, and they were called on to speak and to lead yells 
as they had done when they were in the school. 

After the rally we all journeyed down to the Lick Building, where we spent the 
rest of the evening dancing and greeting our old friends. The rally started "the old 
Lick fighting spirit" going and the way our Tigers trounced Lowell the next day 
proved that our fight didn't stop with the rally. 

[48] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 



VICTORY DANCE 

On Thursday evening, October 25, the Student Body gave a dance in honor of 
the football team, and in celebration of our victory over Lowell. The dance was 
held in the Lick Freehand Drawing Room. Special decorations had been prepared 
for the occasion. 

The music had hardly started before there were almost a hundred dancers on 
the floor, and the occasion was one long to be remembered. In the "Football Special" 
some of our squad showed us that they were as good "steppers" as they were 
football players. 

Everyone who was there had a most enjoyable evening and all agreed it had 
been one of the best dances ever given in the school. 



THE SENIOR DANCE 

Early in the term the Seniors began making plans for the social event of the 
semester, the Senior Dance. A committee, consisting of Weaver, Crane, Johnson, 
Owen, and Hansen, was appointed to make the plans and arrangements for the 
dance. 

After careful consideration, the committee decided that the dance should be 
held on November 24, at the Bellevue Hotel. Ed Stirm's orchestra was chosen to 
furnish the music. 

The bids were placed on sale more than a month before the dance, thus giving 
the fellows plenty of time in which to dispose of them. 

On the night of the event a happy gathering of students, Alumni, and guests 
appeared at the hotel, everyone prepared for a wonderful evening. From the time 
the music began until it ended, there was not a moment when the enthusiasm of the 
dancers slackened in the least. Everyone who was present agreed that it was a 
tremendous success, and that he had spent a most enjoyable evening. 

The '23X Class wishes at this time to express its sincere appreciation to the 
Student Body and the Alumni for the excellent support they gave the dance. 



[49] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 



LUX PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

THE term has been one of successful parties, rallies, and dances. 
More than ever the three schools have cooperated in many events, including 
joint parties, rallies, and dances. The success of the social functions can be 
attributed to the enthusiasm with which the students entered into them. 

The girls have entered into the spirit of cooperation with Lick in a zealous 
manner, backing all joint activities in a manner which was lacking in previous 
semesters. I hope and expect that it will continue into the future, making even a 
greater "Lick Spirit" than ever before. 

A rally was held on August 28 to officially welcome the Freshmen to Lux. 
Members from the organizations told of their work and invited all of the Freshmen 
to enter their respective clubs. 

Plans were made for a Lux "dress-up day," and a business rally was held 
October 27 to tell the girls about them. The idea was to dress to represent the titles 
of books, magazines, or advertisements. The girls were very enthusiastic about the 
plans. 

October 31 was the "red-letter day." At 11:30 all of the girls dressed in their 
costumes and assembled in the corridor. The surprise of the day was the Faculty 
Stunt, in which all of the members participated. The teachers dressed in costumes 
to represent different plays of the year, and enacted scenes from each, in groups of 
two and three. Because of its being a complete surprise, it was thoroughly enjoyed 
and appreciated by the girls. Our Faculty members are certainly clever actresses. 
Clever stunts were presented by different classes, and certainly proved to be 
original and amusing. They were successful, according to the applause they received 
from the girls. After the rally there was a grand march to the roof, where prizes 
were given for the nine best costumes. 

Joint parties have been numerous and successful this semester, and were 
thoroughly enjoyed by the students. A delightful party was given by the Freshmen 
to show that they have acquired the "Lux Spirit." It was a costume party and 
certainly was a success. 

I wish to thank the Faculty for their aid in all of the events of the semester. 
Enough thanks cannot be given to Miss Otto for her untiring efforts in our behalf. 

I also wish to thank the girls for their support in all of the activities, and know 
that my successor will have a successful term because of their loyalty. 

Kathryn Purvis 



[SO] 





Mildred Fagan 
Nancy Bean 



Kathryn Purvis 
[51] 



Elisabeth Andreson 
Miss Pickles 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 



L. W. PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

THE time has now arrived when another class of graduates must leave the 
school that has been closest to their hearts. Although we are bidding farewell 
now, we will always carry with us that great Tiger Spirit; the spirit which 
says, "Fight until the end." That great spirit of loyalty and self-denial is the 
backbone of the Lick-Wilmerding and Lux Schools. In the past four years it has 
been our duty to build up and to foster this spirit, and now that we are going we 
leave this duty to those that follow. 

Those who believe that our Tiger Spirit is dying have been proven wrong. That 
never-say-die spirit is here; our Great Spirit will never be only a memory; it will be 
in the school as long as there is a student left. Witness the wonderful support 
given the football team; and stop and think of the way every student has backed 
up every school activity. We can look back with pride and pleasure upon a brilliant 
term of achievement and success. 

When I go back over the events of my four years in the institution, I realize 
that the L. W. Fighting Spirit is the only thing that made possible the remarkable 
success of our teams and organizations when they had to battle against overwhelm- 
ing odds. That determination to succeed, no matter how dark the outlook, is the 
foundation upon which we build our standards. 

We commenced the term with a snappy opening Rally at which we welcomed 
the Freshmen into the school as true comrades. These fellows have shown that they 
have the real Tiger enthusiasm by their splendid representation in the various 
organizations and on the teams. 

The Senior Dance was the important social event of the term. It was held at the 
Bellevue Hotel, and due to the splendid support of the students and Alumni, its 
success even exceeded expectations. 

You have elected to office fellows who are your choice, fellows who are com- 
petent to manage the affairs which you are entrusting to them. Get behind them, 
cooperate with them, and you may be assured of a prosperous and eventful year. 

During my term of office I have realized the unfailing loyalty of the Faculty in 
backing our every enterprise, and as a parting word I wish to express my heartfelt 
appreciation to them and to the Student Body officers for their unselfish devotion 
in my behalf. 

Albert Owen. 



[52] 





STUDENT-BODY 
OFFICERS 






Albert Owen 



Albert Anderson 
A. De Ryana - R. Mayock 



[53] 



Theodore Haase 
Max A. Plumb, Treasurer 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 







LUX BOARD OF CONTROL 



THE BOARD is the legislative committee of the Student Body; drawing up 
all amendments, passing all school budgets, and looking out for the interest 
of the Student Body in general. 

It is composed of the President, Vice President, and Secretary of the Student 
Body, and one elected representative from each class. 

The members who are responsible for the success of the board are: Elizabeth 
Andresen, secretary; Mildred Fagan, '23X; Edythe Knoles, '24J; Alice Stager, '24X; 
Evelvn Wilds, '25 J; Bernice Salter, '25X; Beatrice Trobock, '26J; Victoria Andersen, 
'26X; and Sarah Adelman, '27]. 

The first meeting was called to order by President Kathryn Purvis on August 
13, 1923, and at this meeting we began a term full of problems. We are pleased to 
state that, although many difficulties have been in our path, we have successfully 
handled all the business which we have undertaken. 



[54] 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



THE L-W-L LIFE 




LICK BOARD OF CONTROL 



THE first regular meeting of the Board of Control was called to order by 
President Owen on August 13. The roll call showed the following repre- 
sentatives from the various classes present; G. Munk, '23X; R. Mayock, 
'24J; R. Sellman, '24X; E. De Mattie, '25J; J. Fannen, '25X; H. Gilmore, '26J; 
E. de Ferrari, '26X; A. Anderson, '27]. 

An election was held and Theodore Haase was elected Secretary of the board. 
Football, track, and basketball budgets were passed at the second meeting of 
the board. It was also at this meeting that the following managers were elected: 
L. Thompson, football; W. Lutje, basketball; A. Throndson, swimming. The re- 
maining budgets were found to exceed the Student Body fund, so the board, with 
the aid of the Faculty Advisers, reduced them to comply with our treasury. 

It is also the duty of the board to pass on all school honors, such as athletic 
medals, blocks, circle blocks, scripts, and other tokens of appreciation. The board 
wishes to thank the Faculty for the support and advice they have given. 

[55] 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 




Dolores O'Donnell, President 



Horace Tilden, President 



LOW SENIORS 

THE Low Senior Class has the pleasure of looking back on a semester full of 
successful achievements. This achievement is a result of cooperation. 

For the past months, appointed committees have successfully handled all 
social activities of the class. On September 2, the girls gave a Matilija Party, honor- 
ing the class of '26J. This was first of a series of parties which have been planned 
for the coming semester. 

Our athletic record ranks among the highest of the school. Interclass champion- 
ships in football and track were captured by '24J. Our S. F. A. L. football stars were: 
Alex Cook, Rodney Chisholm, Frank Cohen, Alvin Dolan, Frank Kern, William 
Lawrence, Caltoft Lausten, Horace Tilden, and Roy Mooney. In track we had 
Richard Keeble, Donald Stewart, Donald Jacobs, and Seymour Marcuse. 

In Lux athletics the class was well represented, the largest representation being 
in basketball. 

Under the editorship of Roy Mooney and Leontine Burroni, the class has con- 
tinued to publish The '2^J Exhaust. 

Our Lux officers for the past semester were: President, Dolores O'Donnell; vice 
president, Dorothy Ratto ; secretary, Alice Newall ; sergeant-at-arms, Freda 
Maybach; yell leader, Ellen Laist. 

Our Lick-Wilmerding officers for the class were: Horace Tilden, president; 
Harry Moran, vice president; Curtis Maybach, secretary; Carl Bettin, treasurer; 
Russell Mayock, Board of Control; Richard Boveroux, sergeant-at-arms. 

As a whole the '24J class has had a very successful semester, and has finished 
everything it has started out to do, with the same zest and spirit which has been 
characteristic of the class since we entered the school. 



[56] 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



THE L-W-L LIFE 




Gladys Crear, President 



Paul Howard, President 



HIGH JUNIORS 

THE fall semester of the class of '24X has been a huge success. 
The girls' business was conducted by Gladys Crear, president; Marjorie 
Connor, vice president; lone Mcintosh, secretary; Bessie Gormer, sergeant- 
at-arms; Irene Trauner, yell leader; Alice Stager, Board of Control. 

At Lick, the class was successfully led by President Howard. Vice President 
Throndson conducted meetings during the absence of the President. Secretary 
Fleissner submitted a favorable report at each meeting. Treasurer David collected 
class dues. Order was maintained by Sellman, sergeant-at-arms. Yells were led by 
Knopfler, and Sellman was the Board of Control member. 

Athletics were well supported by '24X, as follows: 

Football Howard, Kern and Sellman 

Swimming Throndson 

Track . Adams, Bordeau, Knopfler, Rothschild, Skinner 
Basketball Fleissner, Petrino and Purcell 



During the term a Joint Luncheon at Lux was enjoyed by the entire class. The 
luncheon was followed by a dance and the day was successful in bringing together 
and better acquainting the boys and girls of '24X. It is get-together gatherings such 
as these that weld the chain of good-fellowship between our schools. We are looking 
forward to many more enjoyable events during the coming term, so let's be up and 
doing and give our officers added encouragement by cooperating in all their plans. 

[57] 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 




Margaret Arntz, President 



John Hazelwood, President 



LOW JUNIORS 

AT the beginning of the semester the Lux class of '25 J elected its officers with 
r^L the following results: President, Margaret Arntz; vice president, Lois Wil- 
cox; secretary, Cecile Duval; sergeant-at-arms, Irma Wuersching; yell 
leader, Louise Hinterman; Board of Control, Evelyn Wild. 

An important event of the year was the Junior-Freshman Party which was given 
in honor of the class of '27]. Everyone had an enjoyable time, the music and refresh- 
ments being especially appreciated. 

Three joint class meetings were conducted during the term by President Hazel- 
wood. The remaining Lick officers were: Vice president, Everett Stark; secre- 
tary, Frank Haley; treasurer, Allen Kahn; Board of Control, Eddie De Mattie; 
sergeant-at-arms, Frank McMartin; and yell leader, Richard Gledhill. 

'25 J has well supported athletics this term. We captured the interclass swimming 
meet and placed second in the track interclass. O'Brien, Rogers, Schaeffle, and 
Hazelwood were members of the school track team who represented our class. 
In swimming were Throdson, Swiestra, and Miner. Jack Wooll, James Eagan, Frank 
Haley, and Robert Loofbourow play on the football team. 

All school activities are being vigorously supported by the members of the class. 
Going to any of the club meetings or other school activities you will find the '25 J 
class well represented. 



[58] 



DECEMBER, I 923 



THE L-W-L LIFE 




Olga Krieg, President 



eyer, Pre 



HIGH SOPHOMORES 

EARLY in the semester the girls of '25X elected the following officers: Olga 
Krieg, president; Emelina Boggiano, vice president; Myrtle Cavanaugh, 
secretary; Kathleen Kelleher, sergeant-at-arms ; Rose Drakulich, yell 
leader; Beatrice Salter, Board of Control representative. Due to the cooperation 
of the girls with these officers we have enjoyed a successful season. 

Our class has been well represented in athletics. Basketball was supported by 
G. Berg, M. Cavanaugh, F. Barthold, F. Murray, B. Salter, K. Kelleher, H. Meyer, 
E. Boggiano, M. Magner, and R. McBride. In tennis we were represented by 
Genevieve Berg, who is the first girl to have her name on the Lux Tennis Cup. 

Debating and Glee Club are other activities in which the girls of '25X have been 
interested. Our debaters were Florence Barthold, Myrtle Cavanaugh, and Gene- 
vieve Berg, while our songbirds were R. McBride, G. Berg, L. Hall, and R. Mc- 
Guinesse. 

The officers elected by the boys of '25X were: President, Fred Meyer; vice 
president, George Rich; secretary, Carl Mitchell; Board of Control, John Fannen; 
sergeant-at-arms, Louis Mathesen; yell leader, Schubert Inch. 

Achievement has been ours in both social and athletic activities. We were repre- 
sented in football, baseball, swimming, basketball, and tennis. Assisted by the 
girls, we entertained the Seniors at a dance on September 28, and in October we 
enjoyed a class luncheon given on the Lux roof. 

The '25X class wish to take this opportunity to thank Mr. Merrill, Miss Otto, 
and the Faculty for the many helpful suggestions they rendered during the past 
semester. 



[59] 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 




Violet Bucking, President 



Vincent Mires, President 



LOW SOPHOMORES 



UNDER the leadership of our able President, Violet Bucking, the '26J class 
started their Sophomore year with a great deal of enthusiasm. Our other 
officers were: Vice president, Hilde Meyer; secretary, Muriel Smith; 
sargeant-at-arms, Sophie Grabek; yell leader, Cecile Drury. The member elected 
to the Board of Control was Beatrice Troback. Many girls have come out for 
basketball this season and our team was as follows: Tap center, Alice Ritter, Aileen 
Farley; side centers, Thelma Tutt, Lucy Abeling, and Muriel Smith; forwards, 
Audrey Diamond, Alice Slichting, Sophie Grabek, and Grace Lankeman; guards, 
Thelma Tyndell, Violet Bucking, Florence Fannon. We were given a dance on the 
Lux roof Friday, October 5, by the '26J boys, and it was a great success. The '25X 
class furnished the orchestra. 

The class of '26J has always been well up in school activities, and this term has 
not been an exception. In track, swimming, football, and basketball, and in the 
organizations we have been well represented. Nelson, tackle on the football team, 
and Sid Fogarty on the 100-pound basketball team, are our outstanding stars. 
Among our social activities was an enjoyable joint party and dance held just pre- 
vious to the Night Rally. A clever stunt was presented at the Block Rally, and in 
this manner we have become known about school. A group of the fellows have 
organized a party to go swimming at Sutro Baths every week-end, and through this 
companionship close cooperation is sure to result. 

The officers for the past term were: President, Vincent Mires; vice president, 
Ralph Fifield ; secretary, John DeGolia; Board of Control, R. Gilmore; treasurer, 
B. Shearn; and yell leader, F. Galli. 

[60] 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



THE L-W-L LIFE 




Anna Hormay, President 



L. Lausten, President 



HIGH FRESHMEN 



DUE to the cooperation of class officers and students, the '26X class has com- 
pleted a successful semester. These officers at Lux were: A. Hormay, 
president; H. Mann, vice president; J. Smith, secretary; O. Stelling, 
sergeant-at-arms; H. Corbett, song leader. At Lick, L. Lausten, president; J. 
Hurley, vice president; W. Morrison, secretary; S. Tanner, treasurer; D. Thompson, 
sergeant-at-arms; and C. Steel, yell leader, have succeeded in upholding class 
traditions. 

The first event of the term was a luncheon given to the '27] class. The girls 
enjoyed it immensely. A burlesque from "Midsummer Night's Dream" was also 
presented and it proved to be a howling success. 

For the Alumni Nite Rally, a Chinese program was arranged which showed 
that the '26X class was anxious to comply with the school spirit and be represented. 

We have shown up creditably in athletics. Hurley succeeded in placing in both 
swimming and track interclasses, while Prave placed in the track meet and made 
the 100-pound basketball team. S. Lastrucci won his numerals in the interclass 
track meet. 

The freshman football team has shown up very well this year and a number of 
the fellows appear to be excellent material for next year's varsity. 

We have also taken part in other school activities, presenting an enjoyable 
stunt at the night rally held before the Lick-Lowell game. 

[6l] 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 




Edythe Knowi.es, President 



Caltoft Lausten, President 



LOW FRESHMEN 



JUST five months ago we entered Lick-Wilmerding-Lux as the class of '27]. 
Although at first we felt as if we had nothing in common, it was not long before 
we had made friends, and had grasped the true meaning of "Tiger Spirit" as 
manifested by the older students. Our first semester has been one of achievement, 
for Freshmen, due to the capable leadership of C. Lausten and E. Knoles, our 
Senior Advisers. The officers of our class at Lick were: President, A. Rodgers; vice 
President, A. Stockton; Treasurer, T. McCauley; Secretary, G. Batt; Board of 
Control, A. Anderson; Yell Leader, E. Cope. 

The officers of the Lux class were: President, Edythe Knowles; Vice President, 
G. Kirn; Secretary, P. Coburn. 

In athletics we were represented by E. Haas and H. Barbe on the 100-pound 
team, and E. Cope on the 120-pound team. We have organized a class football 
team, and have developed many prospects for the school team of next year. 
Athletics are not our only claim to honor; because we are represented in every 
organization of the school by at least one member. 

The girls had the pleasure of being guests at a series of luncheons given by the 
Girl Reserves. 

The class of '27J takes this opportunity to thank the class of '25 J for the re- 
ception tendered them and hopes to reciprocate in the early part of next semester. 
This also has been the first opportunity of the class to thank the entire Student 
Body for its efforts and patience in welcoming us into Lick-Wilmerding-Lux. 

[62] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 



LUX ORGANIZATIONS 

THE FORUM 

AGAIN the Forum Club has proved itself one of the most active organizations 
at Lux. Under the leadership of its new officers, Helen Cook, president; 
Elsa Von Borstel, vice president; Evelyn Wilds, secretary; Margaret Arntz, 
treasurer; and Nancy Bean, sergeant-at-arms, the Club has completed an unusually 
successful semester. 

The outstanding feature of the term was the presentation of a picturesque 
Indian legend, entitled "Sequoia," at the Lux Redwood Grove, near Larkspur. On 
the same day the Lux Forum Tree was selected from this beautiful grove. 

We also presented "The Red Lamp" and "The Maker of Dreams," and each 
was a great success. 

As one of the main aims of The Forum is to aid in the instruction of Parliamen- 
tary Law, Miss Weller, our adviser, gave us a great deal of drill on this important 
subject. The Club wishes to take this opportunity to thank both Miss Otto and 
Miss Weller for their many helpful suggestions toward our welfare. 

A great interest has been taken in debating by our members ard several inter- 
esting and heated debates have resulted. The Junior class has captured the highest 
laurels of the Club. 



THE GLEE CLUB 

THE Lux Glee Club was unable to make much progress this past six months 
due to the change in the methods of instruction. We are all looking forward 
to a bright future due to the fact that the Freshmen have shown great 
interest in the organization. 

At the beginning of the term Irene Trauner was elected president, and Harriet 
Bird, secretary. Miss Crofts, head of the Physical Education Department of Lux, 
is now the instructor of The Glee Club, and she is being ably assisted by Miss 
Collett. 

When the '27X Class enters the school, an active campaign for new members 
will be entered into, and with their support it is hoped that the Glee Club will come 
back into the place it deserves in respect to the other organizations of Lux. 

[63] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

lux organizations-Co^//;^ 

THE SWIMMING CLUB 

THE Swimming Club has had a truly eventful season. The Freshmen turned 
out splendidly, and have found swimming a beneficial as well as an enjoyable 
sport. 

The officers for the past term were: President, Olga Gastaldi; Vice President, 
Nancy Bean; and Secretary, Rosalie McBride; and they proved highly successful. 

Weekly practice was held at the Y. W. C. A. and many new and promising 
stars shone out brightly in the interclass. The White and Gold was well repre- 
sented in the Interscholastic Meet and we made a wonderful showing. 

We owe much of our success to our faculty adviser, Miss Crofts, who not only 
instructed the new members but spent much time coaching the older girls in the 
art of life saving. 



THE GIRL RESERVES 

THE third year of the "Matilija Club" of the Girl Reserves has come to a 
successful finish. The year's officers were: Olga Gastaldi, president; Margaret 
Arntz, vice president; Norine Benard, secretary; Rosalie McBride, treasurer; 
Frances Lowell, yell leader; Edythe Knowles, sergeant-at-arms; and Grace Kern, 
editor. 

Initiation of new members took place following the Freshmen Luncheon, early 
in the term; many members of this class joined the organization at this initiation. 

The Club was very busy with service work for the McKinley Orphanage, but 
nevertheless we had a number of enjoyable parties and social events. 

The main event of the year was the play presented by the girls at the Letterman 
General Hospital, and our efforts were greatly appreciated by the crippled soldiers. 

The Club, as a whole, wishes to extend its thanks to Miss Pickles, Miss Peavey, 
Miss Roumiguiere, and Miss Gardner. These faculty members have acted as our 
advisers, and have been of great assistance in making such a success of the past 
term. 

An active program has been mapped out for the coming year and with such a 
capable staff of officers and with the same cooperation from the members, the Girl 
Reserves should be the foremost organization at Lux. 

[64] 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



THE L-W-L LIFE 




Irma Wuersching, President 



A. Gustafson, President 



THE CAMERA CLUB 

IF a large membership and hearty enthusiasm are signs of success, the Camera 
Club has had a most successful year. The Club has quite a list of new members, 
and among them are to be found many Freshmen, a fact which signifies success 
for the organization for at least several years to come. 

There have been no exhibits, contests, or hikes this year because the members 
have been too busy with their dark-room work. The Upper Classmen have obtained 
many good results with the enlarging camera, and have also been coloring and re- 
touching photos and enlargements. The Freshmen have been doing a great amount 
of work with contact prints, but they also have made a few successful enlargements. 

In the morning, in Omnibus, after school, and in all spare moments the Club- 
rooms are continually in use. This fact illustrates the deep interest taken in the wel- 
fare of the Organization by its members. Another example of their enthusiasm lies 
in the fact that orderly and well-conducted meetings have been held with regularity, 
every other Thursday. 

The officers chosen at Lux were: President, Irma Wuersching; Vice President, 
Evelyn Wilds; Second Vice President, Elsie Norton; Secretary and Treasurer, Elsa 
Von Borstel. 

The Lick officers were as follows: President, A. Gustafson; Vice President, R. 
Silverberg; Secretary, G. Westlund; Treasurer, H. Greenhood; Sergeant-at-Arms, 
R. Scott. 

The members wish to extend their hearty thanks to Miss Reed, Miss Fassett, 
and Miss Boulware for their constant efforts and thoughtful instruction in endeavor- 
ing to promote the welfare of the Club. 

The Camera Club has at last come into its own, and the coming semester should 
be the most successful in its history. 



[65] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

LICK ORGANIZATIONS 

THE FORUM 

THE Forum is the youngest organization in the school, yet, during its brief 
period of existence, it has established a reputation as a "live" society. Its 
objects are to regulate the activities of the Student Body, to stimulate 
interest in public speaking, and to promote cooperation between the Faculty and 
the students. The membership of the Forum comprises the captains and managers 
of all the teams, the presidents and vice presidents of all the organizations and 
classes, the editor and manager, and the associate editor and associate manager of 
the school journal, all the Board of Control members, the manager and assistant 
manager of the cafeteria, and the custodian and his assistant. 

Miss Wood is the Faculty Director, and at present the roster contains thirty- 
seven names. 

At the meetings all matters pertaining to the welfare of the school are discussed, 
and the social calendar is planned weeks in advance. The members exchange views, 
and freelv criticize or support, as the case may be, the various subjects that are 
introduced. 

In reviewing the achievements of the past term it is extremely difficult to desig- 
nate any one as worthy of special mention, as all the affairs undertaken terminated 
successfully. 

We cannot close without commenting upon the excellent work of Miss Wood. 
Her enthusiasm and discretion proved a constant source of inspiration to the mem- 
bers. Always eager to encourage a timid member and just as tactful in suppressing 
an over-zealous member, Miss Wood earned the confidence of everyone. We sin- 
cerely trust she will be the guiding spirit of the Forum for a long time to come. 



THE ENGLISH CLUB 

A LTHOUGH greatly handicapped by the lack of an auditorium, the English 

/■^ Club has enjoyed a very successful semester. The chief event of the term 

was the addition of a library, purchased with a part of the Taussig Memorial 

Fund. Needless to say, the books were greatly appreciated. Heretofore, the students 

had manifested little or no interest in drama, but with the advent of the library a 

decided change of attitude was noticeable. 

[66] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 



LICK ORGANIZATIONS— Continued 

The meetings were very interesting, as all those who faithfully attended them 
can testify. The program committee, under the direction of E. Aaron, worked 
diligently and their efforts were conducive of good results. 

Miss Donegan was our Faculty Representative and her timely suggestions and 
criticisms proved invaluable to the members. 

The officers for the Fall term were: Moran, president; Aaron, vice president; 
Thompson, secretary; and Jacobs, librarian. 

THE RADIO CLUB 

THE past semester has been an extremely busy one for the Radio Club. The 
operating room has been painted, and a new code practice table will soon be 
completed. The old spark set has been replaced with an up-to-date phone 
transmitter. 

With this additional equipment, club members obtain a more thorough knowl- 
edge of Radio. 

The membership is steadily increasing, and prospective members are at all 
times welcome and will receive every encouragement possible. An attractive pin, 
signifying the purpose of the organization, has been chosen and this has caused 
many to pay attention to the activities of the club. 

We wish to take this opportunity to thank Mr. Merrill for the valuable advice 
and assistance he has given us. 

A capable set of officers guided the club through the past term. They were: 
President, C. Davey; Vice President, J. McCullough; Secretary, J. Steventon; 
Treasurer, C. Hubacher; and Sergeant-at-Arms. A. Esberg, 

THE GLEE CLUB 

THE L-W Glee Club has tried this semester to carry out the hopes anticipated 
by last year's organization. "Great things" have not been accomplished, but 
we are proud of the results of our conscientious efforts. 

The Club consists of fifteen enthusiastic members who have practiced regularly 
twice a week during the semester. The group boasts of a quartet composed of Cook, 
Signer, Gledhill and Eagan. 

We have experienced a very successful semester under the capable leadership of 
Miss Reeves, assisted by Miss Barnum. From present indictions the club should 
experience a successful future. 

[67] 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 




THE LICK-WILMERDING CAFETERIA 

THE management of the Lick -Wilmerding Cafeteria wish to take this 
opportunity to thank the Student Body as a whole for the support given to 
them this semester. The Caf has "gone over big" this term and if the fellows 
continue to back it in the future it will be a permanent and thriving institution. 

Many minor deficiencies have been eliminated through the cooperation of an 
excellent staff and culinary force. The personnel of this staff (appearing from left to 
right in the above picture) is as follows: T. Kearney, T. Haase, P. Howard, J. 
Wooll, H. Crane, A. Wilkinson, R. Barthold, R. Vickers, F. Haley, R. Baum, G. 
Fleissner, L. Thompson, Manager A. Weaver, Assistant Manager H. Tilden, and 
C. Maybach; and (not in the picture) R. Keeble. 

Several new features and improvements have been added; among which is the 
"Football Table." This table is reserved for football men only, and it certainly 
helps to keep the old Tiger Spirit alive. 

Remember this, fellows, "Our little Caf is no Bull!" 



[68] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 



INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITIES 

LUX 

THE Old Girl said all modern girls were useless when it came to the knowledge 
of domestic affairs, not at all like the girls in her day- Everyone tried to con- 
vince her of her error, but to no avail. She demanded proof, so we decided to 
prove it to her in the same manner it was shown to us at the time we were so 
dubious. 

One visit to the Lux School made her ashamed of herself. I never will forget the 
expression on her face as she came to the Sewing Department, where she saw heaps 
of sewing bags, and housekeeping aprons, caps and kimonos, middies, waists, and 
wash dresses, made as neatly as anyone would possibly want by little Freshmen of 
the '27J Class. She was astonished when she saw the lovely remodeled dresses of 
both the High Freshmen and Low Sophomore girls. Their self-designed silk gowns, 
she agreed, were as thoroughly attractive as any she had seen in the old days. The 
practical cafeteria aprons, canvas curtains, and tailored pockets made by the Low 
Seniors did not escape her eager eyes, while at their tailored coats, capes, and one- 
piece dresses she gaped incredulously. 

The dresses created by the Low Sophomores, High Sophs, and High Seniors in 
their Costume Design courses certainly would have pleased even a more critical 
person than our elderly visitor. The Seniors' graduation dresses startled her and 
while she still exclaimed over them we led her to the Cooking Department. 

The First Year course, covering all phases of cooking processes, cheered her old 
domestic-loving soul, as did also the serving of simple home breakfasts and lunch- 
eons. She thought the Second Year course, including meal planning and diatetics, 
was as efficient as the Table Service; in which course the girls plan and serve 
elaborate meals. 

In passing through the corridors on the way to the Drawing Department our 
friend was extremely interested in the various exhibits. She was especially interested 
in the Camera Club display, she remarked, as she had taken great delight in obtain- 
ing snapshots in her younger days. 

It was with much reluctance that she departed from the Drawing Department, 
where the patterns for sewing aprons, color analysis, and lettering, as well as borders 
and cover designs for notebooks, held her eye. Could beginners possibly do so well? 
Perhaps she lingered longer over the High Freshman exhibition, which included 
designs for remodeled dresses and ideas for parchment candle shades. This class's 
work filled the lady with amazement as also did the Low Sophomores' lettering and 
book covers. The '25X Class posters for all School Activities were remarkably 
artistic and drew praise from her. 



[69] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

The Costume Designing course for the -Low and High Juniors filled the Old 
Girl with envy because she had missed similar benefits in her own girlhood; and we 
didn't think she could rave until we showed her the girls' Christmas work. 

It was in the Millinery Department that she confessed her misjudgment of our 
ability in domestic affairs. The flowers made of chenille and the soutache braid 
used to trim the remodeled velvet hats of the lower classmen added to their attrac- 
tiveness which kept up the old lady's ceaseless flow of praise. She failed to under- 
stand how the girls could be so clever to make those neat little sectional crowns and 
pretty frames. As a climax to the revelation, the Low Sophomore Fashion Display 
rendered her speechless. 

With a last look at those attractive Christmas articles, such as lampshades, 
pillows, handkerchief cases, and pin cushions so beautifully dainty, the Old Girl 
left the Lux School thoroughly crushed. She sadly shook her head, and had to admit 
that we had convinced her that the Modern Girl was just twice as industrious as 
the Old-Fashioned Girl. But then, of course, there was no Lux School in her time. 



LICK 

SHEET METAL AND PLUMBING SHOP 

MR. WOOD has started another class of Freshmen on the road to good 
workmanship and a thorough understanding of the various enterprises 
carried on in the shops of the School. They have completed their soldering 
exercises with but few burned fingers; a very rare happening in Frosh classes. Some 
of their pyramids cannot be distinguished as such, due to an over-abundance of 
solder. The Scrubs must figure that excessive use of solder is one way of obtaining 
their money's worth from the #4.25 which they must part with quarterly. 

The younger fellows seem to enjoy threading pipe and doing odd jobs about 
school more than they enjoy soldering; probably because they are out of their 
teacher's sight most of the time in doing the former, while in working with the iron 
they cannot perform "Freshman Pranks." 

[70] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 



STONE SHOP 

THE foundation of the school is the Stone Shop. As the majority of the aspir- 
ants to positions such as brick-layers and plasterers are Freshmen, Senor 
Mighall must be given a great deal of credit for keeping his classes, in the 
foundation, out of mischief. The main achievement of the boys of the '27J Class is 
the paving of the driveways; this adds to the appearance of the school. They have 
also built model fire-places, and the results promise a good future for them when 
they take up their jobs as brick-layers. 

Several high and mighty Seniors are enrolled this term probably due to the fact 
that hod-carriers receive such fabulous salaries at the present time. The principal 
job which these fellows have undertaken and also finished is the repainting of the 
shop. The following '24J's answer to the stone-workers' roll-call: "Big Chief" 
Chisholm, "Hick" Bauermeister, "Dirt" Figel, "Pee-Wee" Moran, "Scrub" 
Benninger, and last and also least, "Butcher-Town's own," "Speed" Mooney. 



CABINET SHOP 

UNDER the supervision of Mr. Holmes the boys are learning that a hammer 
is used to drive something other than finger nails, and that a chisel is a 
dangerous tool. 

The High Freshmen finished their exercises with as much speed as possible so 
that they could start working on the lathe. This is a common occurrence, as wood- 
turning holds more enjoyment for the would-be cabinet maker than ordinary square 
work. 

This shop seems to be very popular with Upper Classmen the last few terms as 
is shown by the attendance every afternoon of Hansen, Sommerfeld, McMartin, 
Pratt, Sellman, and also Crane. These boys have turned out a number of well-made 
floor lamps, cedar chests, and other useful pieces of furniture. 



FORGE SHOP 

CLANG! Crash! Clane! is the sound that echoes through the building. Yes, 
it is the Forge Shop. Grimy, dirt-smeared Sophs are doing their best to turn 
out their exercises. The ever-persistent clinker is present today the same as it 
was for the men of Lick in the days past, much to the annoyance of the forge workers. 
Nevertheless the boys are working hard and their exercises are very satisfactory. 



[71] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

Mr. Mathis, the able instructor, is busy doing oxy-acetylene welding on various 
things about school. He made all of the iron braces for the rally benches, and he 
made the iron doors for the entrance to the coal bin. Both of these are helpful 
accomplishments and deserve the appreciation of the students. 



MACHINE SHOP 

MR. SUNKEL has a large class of High Sophs who have finished their pre- 
liminary exercises in fine style and are trying their skill on the lathes. 
The Junior apprentices are doing odd jobs around school, while the 
Senior apprentices, Nelson, Wuthrich, Andrews, Cadigan, and Kern, have been 
doing first class work. Nelson rebuilt a lathe for Auto Shop, while Wuthrich set and 
lined up the machinery in the Stone Shop. "Phat" Andrews has completed a coil- 
winding machine for Electric Shop. Kern and Cadigan have worked very hard in an 
effort to complete the steam hoist. 



ELECTRIC SHOP 

MR. O'CONNER has accomplished some fine work this past semester. 
Battery and motor work have been taught to the beginning apprentices. 
Ames and Killeen have been doing great work in the battery depart- 
ment while Keyes is a past master at motor work. Stewart and Keyes have been 
running the picture machines at Lux and Lick. Dolan and Boveraux have installed 
a new lighting system in the Cabinet Shop. Haussler, Peterson, and Roach have 
been doing line work in the Chemistry room and in the Shop. Signer, who has charge 
of the Radio outfit, has succeeded in installing new apparatus in the operating 
rooms. 



AUTO SHOP 

UNDER the capable guidance of Mr. Dow, the Auto Shop has done the im- 
possible; put the Kelly truck in working order, an accomplishment that 
bestows credit on the skipper of the Shop. Cars are constantly brought in 
and the fellows are kept very busy. 

"Shark" Clyde and "Mope" Gilfether are creditable auto wreckers; Lund, 
Thompson, McKeown, Goodhue, Bendele, and Kearney are the other Senior 
apprentices and they are all doing good work; even "Chief" Dixon will vouch for 
their ability as mechanics. Messrs. Lefler, Sunkel, and Mighall have had their cars 
overhauled during the term, and on these jobs the Juniors have learned the rudi- 
ments of wrecking and overhauling an automobile. 

[72] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

CHEMISTRY 

THE chemistry apprentices, under the able supervision of Mr. Tibbetts, have 
made commendable progress in the intricacies of chemical analysis. 

The Seniors have completed their preliminary quantitative work and are 
now well along in the study of actual industrial analysis. They have completed 
detailed analysis of carbonate rock, Portland cement, and soil, which gives them 
hopes of becoming successful chemists in the far distant future. These would-be 
chemists are Ewing, Meyer, and Mangelsdorf. 

The laboratory is afflicted with eight Juniors this term in the persons of Adams, 
Bangert, DeMattie, Kaplan, Rogers, Loofbourow, Petrino, and Vickers. They have 
the Seniors in a perpetual state of nervousness with their hair-raising exploits 
in the laboratory. However, with the guiding hand of Mr. Tibbetts upon them, and 
with what professional advice they can coax from the Seniors, they also entertain 
hopes of becoming widely known industrial chemists. Meanwhile they are clearing 
the mysteries of their elementary problems. 



MECHANICAL DRAWING 

THIS year Mr. Heymann has another large class of apprentices. There must 
be some attraction in this room, because in the last few years the classes 
have been growing and growing, until now the spacious drawing room is 
taxed to its capacity. 

Gianetti, Green, and Munk are drawing plans for bungalows, Haase, Buchholz, 
and Hendrickson are drawing up gas engines, Howard, Kull, and Minor are on their 
plates, while Dooley, Stirm, and Cadigan are working on graphic statics. Miss 
Lamb is working on some brakes and Mathis is perfecting a transmission, while 
Nemeth is working on a hydraulic intensifier. 

Under the instruction of Mr. Miehle, a former Lick student, the elementary 
classes are learning the principles of drawing. 



FREEHAND DRAWING 

THIS department, under the supervision of Miss Boulware, has again turned 
out some most creditable work. Maybach, Munk, de Ferrari, Green, Gianetti, 
Gilfether, Logie, and O'Brien have been doing some fine work for the 
journal, and the Senior boys have been busy doing line drawings and architec- 
tural work. 



[73] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

THE STUDENTS'- EXCHANGE 

UNDER the able management of Hendrickson, assisted by "Oliver" Twist, 
the Book Exchange has made a reputation for itself. A large stock of books 
of all descriptions are to be bought at unheard-of prices. 

The Hockshop has never before experienced such a continual jingle of coin 
rolling over its counters and the manager wishes to thank the students for their 
hearty co-peration in this respect. 

If the fellows continue to back up the Exchange, the Student Body Treasury 
will soon become overflowing with wealth. 



THE SCHOOL CUSTODIAN 

DICK" Boveroux, as Custodian, has more than proved his worth. Without 
the help of an assistant, which he is supposed to have, he has carefully 
managed the Custodian Department throughout the busiest semester of 
the school year. 

The handing out and returning of the track suits is, in itself, quite a job, but 
there are in addition football, basketball, and swimming suits to consider. The 
athletes are careless and forgetful about returning their borrowed material; there- 
fore the Custodian must be on duty all of the time. He would surely appreciate any 
co-peration which the fellows might give him by returning their suits promptly. 



A WORD FROM THE EX-SERVICE MEN 
Ernest Erickson 

OUR crowd is getting small, but our confidence in you and your School is as 
big, yes bigger than ever. It will be a pleasure in years to come to look 
back on the days which we spent with you. Your cheerful spirit alone is 
enough to make any Disabled Veteran of the World War well without any further 
treatment. 

We thank you for your kindnesses of the past, and we wish you all, especially 
the Graduating Class, a well-earned success. 

[74] 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



WEARERS OF LETTERS 



Edythe Knoles 
Betty Duckel 
Olga Connell 



BLOCK L 

Basketball 

Frances Ogier 
Elizabeth Andreson 
Margaret Arntz 



Louise Hintermann 



Irma Wuersching 
Goldie Van Wey 
Olga Gastaldi 
Ellen Flack 



BLOCK L-W 

Swimming 

Carl Mitchell 
Harold Crane 



John Hazelwood 
Donald Stewart 



Track 



Robert Rothchild 
Richard Keeble 



Walter Ames 
Albert Anderson 
Arthur Bahr 
William Best 
Roderick Chisholm 
Frank Cohn 
Alex Cook 
Alvin Dolan 
James Eagan 
John Fannen 



Football 

Harold Crane, Captain 
Maggio Gianetti 
Theodore Haase 
Frank Haley 
Paul Howard 
Ward Junker 
Frank Kern 
Caltoft Lausten 
William Lawrence 
Robert Loofbourow 
Carl Mitchell 



Roy Mooney 
Earl Nelsen 
Charles Robertson 
Joseph Simone 
Roland Sellman 
Horace Tilden 
Edward Throndson 
Leroy Twist 
John Valianos 
Jack Wooll 



[76] 




[77] 




"Another wonderful season has passed, 
but the memory of my association with the 
loyal fighting group of Lick-Wilmerding 
boys will never fade. Hard work, co-operation, 
undying fight, Faculty and Student support, 
all are important factors in whatever success 
we obtained. Personally it is my wish that, to 
the measure that I have tried to give, every 
boy will leave with the same loyal devotion and 
respect as shown toward me during the sea- 
son s hard grind." 

Coach Hollingbery. 



"In commenting on the work of the fellows 
during the past season, I wish to thank them 
for the support they have given me, and the 
fight they have shown. The team s success is 
entirely due to Mr. Hollingbery 's excellent 
coaching.'' 

Captain Crane. 



■^-w ^^ 



"The Tigers win games, first, because the 
team always has the proverbial 'Tiger 
Spirit;' second, because under-classmen are 
always given a chance and consequently there 
are always veterans; and third because of the 
spirited coaching of Mr. Hollingbery." 

Asst. Coach Lefler. 



f\ 



"The success of this year's team was en- 
tirely due to the stellar coaching of Mr. 
Hollingbery and the fighting spirit of the 
squad. The Student Body's support at the 
games was also a big factor in helping the 
team." 

Manager Thompson. 






[78] 



) 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 



FOOTBALL, 1923 

THE Lick "Tigers" have had a very successful season on the gridiron due 
to Coach Hollingbery's splendid work and Captain Crane's leadership. 
There were many candidates out for the team and with a good list of veterans 
on hand, we were not lacking material. Laurence Thompson, who managed the 
team, secured the practice games which prepared the "Tigers" for the S. F. A. L. 

On Saturdav, September 8, after learning the fundamentals, we played the 
Lick Alumni, at the Park Stadium. The game was loosely played but the Tiger 
scoring power was shown by the 30-12 score. One week later, on September 15, 
the team defeated the Berkeley Deaf and Dumb School very easily to the tune of 
63-0. In this game the backfield got off to long runs, and the defense showed much 
improvement. Our next and last practice game was played with Oakland High, 
the highly touted transbay team. The line's hard charging and the speed of the 
backs were too much for the Oakland team, and they were trampled by a 30-0 
score. In this game our fighting line rarely had yards made against them. 

In our opening game of the S. F. A. L. we met St. Ignatius, and we defeated 
them by the score of 61-0. In this game the team showed its wonderful offensive 
power. 

Our next game, in which we played Sacred Heart, was a modified repetition of 
the previous one. We came out on the long end of a 34-0 score. 

After being pepped up the night before by a huge bonfire rally, our gridders went 
out and decisively defeated our ancient rival, Lowell, by a 21 to 6 score. This game 
showed the powerful attack in our backfield and the strength in our line. 

We next tackled the strong Mission team, and took some of the strength out of 
them to the tune of 21 to 0. In this game our line showed its stonewall defense and 
the backfield again proved they were one of the best in the league. 

In closing, too much credit cannot be given to Russell Vickers, who acted as 
trainer for the squad. He worked hard and faithfully, and was largely responsible 
for the excellent physical condition of the men. 



[79] 




"Mope" Ames — Guard 
Height 5 feet n inches, weight 164 pounds, 
2nd year. A fast charging guard who breaks 
up many plays behind the line. 

"Skinney" Anderson — End 
Height 6 feet 3 inches, weight 172 pounds, 
2nd year. Little Albie is a wonder on offense, 
at catching passes, and at breaking up inter- 
ference. 



"Art" Bahr — Guard 
Height 5Jeet 9 inches, weight 166 pounds, 
1st year. A tough man to take out of a play, 
and good at opening holes. 



"Bill' Best — End 
Height 5 feet II inches, weight J 60 pounds, 
1st year. A very hard fighter, equally good on 
offense and defense. 

"Red" Chisholm — Fullback 
Height 6 feet 3 inches, weight 195 pounds, 
jth year. The wa y Red backs up the line and 
carries the ball proves he is the best Full in the 
city. 



' 



-^yy\, 



"Rat" Cohn — End 
Height 5 feet 8 inches, weight 13/ pounds, 
2nd year. A hard clipper and a good defensive 
man. Frank surely can catch passes, also. 



"Alex" Cook — Center 
Height 5 feet 8 inches, weight 170 pounds, 
3rd year. Al makes his passes true, and he 
charges hard and low. 

"Tony" Dolan — End 
Height 6 feet l /i inch, weight 173 pounds, 
3rd year. A good charge and a habit of 
smearing runs are his assets. 



[SO] 





"Jimmy" Eagan — End 
Height 3 feet 6yi inches, weight 140 
pounds, 2nd year. 'Jim is good at breaking up 
runs but at catching passes he has no peer 
in the S. F. A. L. 

"Fannie" Fannen — Tackle 
Height 3 feet n inches, weight 147 pounds, 
1st year. John Joseph, Junior, is light but 
he makes it up with fight. 



"Merv" Green — Quarterback 

Height 3 feet J}4 inches, weight 140 pounds, 
2nd year. Merv is short and fast and his 
tricky running makes him hard to stop. 



"Maggie" Gianetti — Guard 
Height 3 feet 11 inches, weight 183 pounds, 
3rd year. A stonewall on defense and a hard 
clipper makes Maggie a tough "egg" for the 
opposition. 

"Ted" Haase — Center 
Height 3 feet 8 inches, weight 168 pounds, 
2nd year. Ted passes accurately and blocks 
the center hole in fine style. 



"Tiny" Haley — Tackle 
Height 6 feet 1 inch, weight 1/3 pounds, 
1st year. Frank is a big fellow and gives his 
opponents a rough time. 



"Red" Howard — Half and Full 
Height 3 feet 8 inches, weight 136 pounds, 
2nd year. Paul is hard-hitting and possesses 
speed and a fine boot. 

"Junk" Junker — Halfback 
Height 3 feet J inches, weight 142 pounds, 
1st year. He carries the ball in a fine style with 
lots of speed. 





"Frankie" Kern — Guard 
Height 5 feet 8% inches, weight 170 pounds, 
1st year. A hard-charging guard who is hard 
to take out of the play. 

"Whitey" Lausten — Guard 
Height § feet 10 inches, weight 170 pounds, 
2nd year. Caltoft is a hard-charging guard 
who opens the line for the backs; and he 
makes jarring tackles on the offensive. 



"Babe" Lawrence — Half and Full, 
Height 6 feet 3 inches, weight 172 pounds, 
2nd year. Bill is a very clever open-field 
runner and is a fine punter and drop-kicker. 




-Center 

Height 6tfeet, weight 147 pounds, 1st year. 
Loofy is a capable center and can be relied 
upon to hold his own. 

"Cowboy" Mitchell — Quarter 
Height 5 feet 6 inches, weight 135 pounds, 
7 st year. A scrappy little quarter who is good 
at interference work. 



"Re? 



Mooney — Halfback 



Height 5 feet 5 inches, weight 123 pounds, 
1st year. The smallest man on the squad yet 
is fast and is a terror on runs. 



"Swede" Nelson — Tackle 
Height 6 feet 1 inch, weight 173 pounds, 
1st year. A big man who is on top of the play 
before it is started. 

"Skinney" Robertson — Guard 
• Height 6 feet 1 inch, weight 145 pounds, 
1st year. A light man for guard but is fast 
and is a sure tackier. 





[82] 



w 



"Moose" Sellman — Tackle 
Height 6 feet 2 inches, weight 195 pounds, 
3rd year. Roland is the largest man on the 
line and he charges into the play before the 
interference has a chance. 

"Joe" Simons — Guard 
Height 5 feet 7 inches, weight 165 pounds, 
2nd year. The Mighty foe plays guard and 
fights hard, the enemy making few gains 
through him. 



"Beardy" Stark — Tackle 
Height 6 feet 2 inches, weight 190 pounds, 
1st year. Stark "knows his stuff" and has 
little trouble executing it. 



"Eddie" Throndson — Halfback 

Height 5 feet 7 inches, weight 138 pounds, 
1st year. Ed is a good man on defense and also 
at carrying the ball£ l ^^/{^ Jls 



"Horse" Tilden — Halfback 

Height 5 feet 8 inches, weight 130 pounds, 
2nd year. Horace is a very fast man when 
carrying the ball and he is used on end runs 
and criss-crosses. 



"Oliver" Twist — Tackle 

Height 3 feet 9 inches, weight 133 pounds, 
1st year. A good defensive player who stops 
all plays in his territory. 



"Rope" Valianos — End 
Height 5 feet 7 inches, weight 142 pounds, 
1st year. A good man on the defense and at 
catching passes. 

"Jack" Wooll — Quarter and Half 
Height 5 feet 6 inches, weight 148 pounds, 

3rd year. Jack is a valuable man because he 

knows football and clips hard. 




[83 1 



£*JiMjU. 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 




S. F. A. L. CHAMPIONS, 1923 



BECAUSE of a very long season, baseball did not receive due consideration 
in the June issue of the school journal. At the start of the season the out- 
look was very bright, a number of veterans answering the call for the team. 
Although handicapped by not having a coach the fellows moulded a well-balanced 
outfit and surprised the dopesters by winning the S. F. A. L. Championship. This 
was the first time in fifteen years that a baseball team representing this institution 
has accomplished this feat. 

Going over the games of the past season we remember beating the highly touted 
Poly team 3-0, also Lowell to the tune of 5-2, along with the other local schools, and 
then by a 7-0 victory over Commerce we won the S. F. A. L. trophy. 

Not satisfied with one honor we entered the C. I. F. and beat Tamalpais High 
14-4. A week later San Mateo broke our winning streak by beating us in one of the 
most thrilling and well-played games of the season. The final score was 5-4. 

The champions are Capt. Brandon, "Pep" Adams, "Duke" Mallon, "Red" 
Howard, "Bud" Bowen, "Ray" Fauss, "Babe" Crane, John Curtis, "Dink" Kotta, 
"Bob" Klein, "Steve" Nemeth, and John Valianos. 

[84] 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



THE L-W-L LIFE 




JUNIOR TRACK TEAM 

LICK'S Junior track team for the first time in many a year placed second in the 
S. F. A. L. They started the season with a fast interclass, kept up the good 
work by defeating Cogswell in a dual meet, and came in fast with a second in 
the "Big Meet." 

Prave, Rothchild, Marcuse, and Schlumpberger were our 100-pound stars. They 
proved to be a fast aggregation, and are hard to beat. Hazlewood, Ivani, O'Brien, 
and Hubacker supported the 110-pound division, and did some good work. 
Stewart, Lastrucci, Mooney, and Jacobs, Rogers, Schaefle, Jackelovich, Knopfler, 
and Capt. Keeble in the 130-pound class formed a combination of stars that upheld 
the Tiger Spirit. 

Much credit is due to Mr. Tibbetts and Manager Mayock for what they have 
done for the team. 

Next term there are both Senior and Junior Track meets and it is sincerely 
hoped that the heavyweights, as well as the lighter boys, will turn out in the spirit 
and numbers that the fellows did this term and try their hardest to put Lick's 
name at the top of the result sheet. 

[85] 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 




THE SWIMMING TEAM 

THIS year's Swimming Team was seriously handicapped, owing to the fact 
that several of the swimmers also played football and were unable to take 
part in the practice. 

Due to the regular practice which the rest of the team was able to undergo, and 
the coaching and able leadership of both Captain Mitchell and Manager Throndson, 
the team succeeded in taking third place in the S. F. A. L. Meet. 

A successful interclass was held at Sutro Baths and was won by the '25 Class, 
'24, '23, '26, and '27 finishing in the order named. 

TheSchoolTeam was composed of fourteen men and as a very few will be missing 
next season the school should be well represented in the water the coming semester. 

In the 130-pound class we were ably represented by Capt. Mitchell, E. Thrond- 
son, and Miner. In the Unlimited division, Crane, Harris, A. Throndson, and 
Howard swam the sprints in a championship manner, while Aaron went in for the 
breast-stroke. Cook, Panella, and Swierstra showed their class in the distance 
events. Crane and Drake did the fancy diving, while Lausten and Thompson 
attended to the plunging. 

[86] 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



THE L-W-L LIFE 




GIRLS' ATHLETICS 

Lux Baseball Champions 

THE spring semester of baseball was supported with great enthusiasm by all 
classes. A team composed of three classes, '24J, '24X, and '25X, proved to be 
the best team on the field. This team included Captain Edythe Knoles, 
Leontine Burroni, Olga Connell, Elizabeth Andresen, Genevieve Lawson, Frances 
Agier, Margaret Nagner, Bernice Salter, Rosalie McBride, Marian Locke, and Rose 
Drakulich. All of the games were held in the newly constructed Lux Stadium. 

Basketball is receiving unusual support this term. The various teams are 
practicing very hard under the leadership of their individual captains. The teams 
are divided into two divisions, namely, the Upper and the Lower. The '26X class 
captured the Lower division championship, and the '25J the Upper. The entire girl 
Student Body is looking forward to the deciding game in which these two teams meet. 
Under the guidance of Pres. Genevieve Berg, the Tennis Club has accomplished 
wonders. They have just finished a very successful tournament. The girls wish to 
thank Miss Crofts for her endeavors to encourage athletics. 



[87] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 



JUNIOR BASKETBALL 

100-POUND TEAM 

HE "midgets" are rapidly rounding into shape under the able direction of 
Coach Lefler, and Manager Lutje, and they will put up a hard tight in the 
S. F. A. L. 



T 



Although Captain O'Brien is the only veteran, the other players are showing up 
well, and the team has made a good showing in its practice games. 

They lost their first game of the season to San Mateo's 100-pound team after a 
hard fight, 9 to 7. They lost a well, contested game to Sequoia by a score of 8 to 1. 
Their third game was against St. Ignatius, and after giving a wonderful exhibition 
of basketball they were defeated in the last few minutes, the score being 16 to 14. 

Captain "Dink" O'Brien is in the center, with "Sid" Fogerty and "Johnny" 
Prave playing forwards, while "Dick" Gledhill and "Bill" Cadigan are the guards. 
"Frenchy" Bobay, "Seemore" Marcuse, and Red Haas are the substitutes who are 
always there when needed. 



120- POUND TEAM 

THE 120-pound team under the leadership of Captain Sommerfeld got off to a 
flying start and expect to keep up the good work. 

In their first game they traveled down to San Mateo and beat them 13 to 9. 
For the second game thev again went down the peninsula, but this time they were 
defeated by Sequoia High School by a score of 13 to 9. In their third game they 
played St. Ignatius and trounced them 14 to 2. Their fourth game was against the 
Y. M. I. 130-pound team, and they made a good showing holding, their heavier 
opponents to a 23-16 score. 

The players who are out to make the team a success are "Pussy" Purcell, "Wop" 
Petrino, and "Scotchy" De Mattie, forwards; "Scrub" Koch and "Specs" Fleissner, 
centers; "Kutie" Kull, Captain "Bud" Sommerfeld, "Don" Stewart, "Louie" 
Signer, and "Swede" Stromberg, guards. 

Much credit is due to Coach Lefler and Manager Lutje for their untiring efforts 
on behalf of the team, and the players take this opportunity of thanking them for 
their splendid work. 

[88] 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



THE L-W-L LIFE 




FAMOUS PLAYS, BY FAMOUS PLAYERS 

The Ole Swimming Hole Panella 

Enemies of Women Bjork and Johnson 

Two Minutes to Go Crane 

Human Wreckage Andrews 

Our Leading Citizen Weaver 

The Small Town Idol Best 

Why Worry} Buchholz 

A Close Shave Barthold 

The Slow Express De Ryana 

Daddy Long Legs Anderson 

The Abysmal Brute Stearns 

One Exciting Night Gianetti 

Queen of Sheba Esther Levy 

Huckleberry Finn Sweet 

The Million-Dollar Baby Haase 

Face Value Mildred Fagan 

A Tailor-Made Man Gustafson 

Little Lord Fauntleroy Owen 

The Shock . . Peterson 

The Pinch Hitter Clyde 

A Fool There Was* Green 

The Kid Sommerfeld 

The Wayward Son Ames 

Day Dreams Gilfether 

The Boss Hendrickson 

Empty Arms Hansen 

Johnny Get Your Gun Killeen 

The Secret Formula " . . . Ewing 

The Town Terror Wuthrich 

*Green's own contribution. 

[89] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

A Love Sick Romeo - Stirm 

The Rustle of Silk Kathryn Purvis 

A Model Husband Haussler 

Deep Sea Mystery Strom berg 

The Bad Man Meyer 

The Image Maker Munk 

The Handy Man Nelson 

Prof. Plumb — Anderson, what do you know about the microbe family? 
"Skinney" — Please sir, my parents told me not to talk about other people's 
affairs. 

© © © © 

Andrews — Young man, can I get into the park through this gate? 
Bjork — Guess so, Fat; I just saw a load of hay go through. 

Mildred — What is your occupation? 
De Ryana — I used to be an organist. 
Mildred — Why did you give it up? 
"Dooly" — The monkey died. 

© © © ffi 

Green (giving report on economy) and the housewives must do their bit 

by lowering their wastes. 

© © © © 

Pappas Bros. & Co., Inc., Ltd., proprietors of the Western Pacific Market, 
Sixteenth Street and Potrero Avenue, have supplemented their old gag, "How 
long you beena theese countree ?" with this : "Who came to theese countree first, you 
or your father?" 

© © © © 

Here's to my lady's eyebrow, 

In olden days 'twas so fair; 
But, alas! it grows smaller and smaller; 

'Tis now only one little hair. 

© © © e 

Miss Weller (talking on Economics) — Can anyone explain the process of ob- 
taining a draft? 

De Ryana — Open all the doors and windows. 

Mr. Plumb — What did Archimedes say when he stepped into his bath and it 
overflowed ? 

Ames — I have found it. 

Mr. Plumb— What did he find? 

Gianetti (in back of room) — The soap. 

[90] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

Fred Buchholz — When is Hansen thinking of getting married? 
Ed Stirm — Constantly. 

Owen — What's worse than raining cats and dogs? 
Panella — I don't know. 
Owen — Hailing taxicabs. 

© © © © 

Andrews — Do I make myself plain? 
Clyde — Nope, Nature did it for you. 

© © © © 

Hello! Hawaii? 
Haiti tell ye. 
Oh, Guam! 

Hello! Hungary? 

Yes, Siam. 

Come on — I'll Fiji. 

a e e e 

Kathryn — I don't care for men. In fact I've said "No" to several of them. 
Roy — What were they selling? 

© © © © 

Things We Never See 
A sheet from the bed of a river, 
A tongue from the mouth of a stream, 
A toe in the foot of a mountain, 
And a page from a volume of steam. 
A hair from the head of a hammer, 
A bite from the teeth of a saw, 
A race on the course of study, 
And a joint from the limb of the law. 
A check that is drawn on a sandbank, 
Some fruit from the jamb of a door, 
A joke that is cracked by Max A. 
That has never been heard before. 



Mr. Plumb — Can anyone name a liquid that won't freeze? 
Bill Best — Sure. Hot water. 



Red — Say, Harold, did it ever dawn on you — 
Harold — No, Helen never lets me stay out that late. 

[91] 



THE L-W-L LIFE DECEMBER, I923 

There was a young lady from Blair 
Whose face was attractive and fair; 

Not a girl in the place 

Had her beauty and grace, 
Which she ruined by bobbing her hair. 

There was a young girl in San Joe's 
Who was fair and as sweet as a rose; 

Not a wren on the street 

Was so dainty and neat, 
But she spoiled it by whitewashing her nose. 

A sweet thing who lived up in Corning 
Was so fair as to need no adorning — 

'Til she started to paint; 

Now a beauty she "ain't," 
And she looks like the dickens next morning. 

© © © © 

Meyer is so dumb he thinks they get rock-cod from a quarry. 

© © © © 

Horsin' Around 
"Oh, Horse," she said, on greeting him. 

In tones of great alarm, 
"I heard that in the football game 

You'd broken your left arm." 

Horse calmed her tender, groundless fears, 

With vehemence and with haste; 
And just to prove the arm was sound 

He slipped it 'round her waist. 

So, resting close beside him, 

She smiled sweetly in his face, 
"That's great," she said, "not broken, 

Nor even out of place." 

Haase is so dumb that he thinks "Custer's Last Stand" is the name of an orange- 
ade establishment. 

© © © © 

A Sad, Sad Story 
A long time ago, I remember quite well, 
Alongside a poorhouse a maiden did dwell. 
She lived with her mama and papa, serene; 
Her age it was red, and her hair seventeen. 

[92] 



DECEMBER, I923 THE L-W-L LIFE 

Now close by this maiden her lover did dwell, 

He was bow-eyed, and hump-kneed, and cross-backed as well, 

He said, "Let us fly by the light of your star, 

For you are the eye of my apple you are." 

"Oh, no!" cried the maiden, so cautious and wise, 
"My father would scratch out your nails with his eyes. 
If you really love me, don't bring me disgrace," 
She cried as she buried her hands in her face. 

But nothing could daunt this hard-hearted knave, 
He drew from his pocket the knife of his blade; 
And plunging it into her bosom so fair, 
He dragged her around by the head of her hair. 

Now, just as this moment her papa appeared, 
He gazed at the sad sight with eyes in his tears, 
He knelt down beside her. Her cold corpse he kissed. 
And rushed with his nose at the murderer's fist. 

He rushed at the murderer and told him to bolt, 
He drew a horse-pistol he'd raised from a colt; 
The villain was quick and quite agile, 'tis true, 
He'd told him to fly, so he flew up the flue. 

So this is the end of my story so bold, 
If it never had happened, 'twould never been told; 
But don't let it grieve you or make your heart thump, 
Or cause you to have a big throat in your lump. 



Keeble wonders if they put jelly on the bread in the Sandwich Islands. 



Miss Weller — That is the fourth time I saw you look at Freda's paper. 
Haase (burning up) — Yes, ma'am, but she doesn't write very plainly. 



The Joke Editor digs and toils, 
Till his finger-tips are sore; 

Then some poor fish is sure to say, 
I've heard that one before. 

[93] 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 




































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[94] 



DECEMBER, I 9 2 3 



THE L-W-L LIFE 



AUTOGRAPHS 



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TS^e^y 



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This Issue of 
L-W-L LIFE 

FROM THE PRESS OF 

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565 Market Street 
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